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    Our Festival

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    A Festival of Ideas

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    SCHEDULE

    THIS SCHEDULE IS
    SUBJECT TO (and probably will) CHANGE

    Latest change: Monday 25 August
    Friday morning, September 5
    9-9:45 Town Center Legacy Room TOMMY HAYS - What I Came to Tell You: A Middle Grade Novel:
    Tommy will talk about and read from his recently released middle grade novel What I Came to Tell You, told from the point of view of a 12-year-old boy named Grover. Since his mother’s death, the only thing that gives him solace is the hours he spends working on his art in the beloved bamboo grove near his Asheville home. His overworked father, who happens to be Director of the Thomas Wolfe House, belittles his efforts; he feels his son is wasting his time and throwing life away. As tensions within and without the family build to a boiling point, help tiptoes its way into their lives. A mountain family has moved into the cheap rental nearby, and slowly they work their way into Grover’s forest—and his heart. Tommy will discuss the book’s origins, his use of Asheville and Mitchell County as setting and his first venture into writing children’s books. He will also talk about the book’s exploration of art as a way for children to express grief. For more information about What I Came to Tell You, please go to www.tommyhays.com

    9-9:45 Town Hall ALLAN WOLF - Reading/Author Talk  VOICES FROM THE TITANIC: Discovering History Through a Poet's Eyes.  Come explore the most famous ship in the world, and meet a few of the passengers who sailed on her doomed maiden voyage.  Poet and author, Allan Wolf, will guide you through a tour of his novel in verse, The Watch that Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic, chosen this year's North Carolina's YA Book of the Year.  Featuring music, slides, readers theatre, and a five-foot-long foam rubber Titanic "puppet," this Author Session will bring to life the famous ship as well as some of those who sailed her.

    9-9:45 1st Baptist Church KATEY SCHULTZ  Schultz will read from her award-winning collection of short stories. Most of these stories take place in lands far away--Iraq & Afghanistan--but in the spirit of this year's CMLF theme of remembering, she will read one story in particular from her collection that takes place in Western North Carolina, featuring a widow who learns how to move on, keeping the memory of her husband close.

    9-11:45 Workshop - Fiction Writing - with AMY WILLOUGHBY BURLE.  $25 - advance registration required - see Workshop page for details

    STILL FRIDAY MORNING...

    10-10:45 Town Center Legacy Room TOMMY HAYS - What I Came to Tell You: A Middle Grade Novel:
    Tommy will talk about and read from his recently released middle grade novel What I Came to Tell You, told from the point of view of a 12-year-old boy named Grover. Since his mother’s death, the only thing that gives him solace is the hours he spends working on his art in the beloved bamboo grove near his Asheville home. His overworked father, who happens to be Director of the Thomas Wolfe House, belittles his efforts; he feels his son is wasting his time and throwing life away. As tensions within and without the family build to a boiling point, help tiptoes its way into their lives. A mountain family has moved into the cheap rental nearby, and slowly they work their way into Grover’s forest—and his heart. Tommy will discuss the book’s origins, his use of Asheville and Mitchell County as setting and his first venture into writing children’s books. He will also talk about the book’s exploration of art as a way for children to express grief. For more information about What I Came to Tell You, please go to www.tommyhays.com

    10-10:45 Design Gallery PAT RIVIERE-SEEL - The Intersection of Memory and Imagination: Crafting poems from our memories can be slippery business. “Who the Hell cares about Anne Sexton’s grandmother,” W.H. Auden famously complained after a poetry reading. And, yes, the worst defense of a poem is still, “it really happened.” Richard Hugo said that the subject that initiates a poem “should trigger the imagination as well as the poem.” So, how do we use our memories to trigger our imagination and write the poems that need to be written? Join Pat for a reading and discussion on crafting poems from memories.

    10-10:45 Town Hall ALLAN WOLF - Reading/Author Talk  VOICES FROM THE TITANIC: Discovering History Through a Poet's Eyes.  Come explore the most famous ship in the world, and meet a few of the passengers who sailed on her doomed maiden voyage.  Poet and author, Allan Wolf, will guide you through a tour of his novel in verse, The Watch that Ends the Night: Voices from the Titanic, chosen this year's North Carolina's YA Book of the Year.  Featuring music, slides, readers theatre, and a five-foot-long foam rubber Titanic "puppet," this Author Session will bring to life the famous ship as well as some of those who sailed her.  

    11-11:45 Town Center Legacy Room KANE SMEGO

    "From Greece to Griots to Gripping the Mic" - Explore the history of the oral tradition, storytelling, and poetry as a tool for documenting and transmitting history, culture, and ideas across time and space.


    Friday afternoon, September 5

    12-12:30 Town Center Legacy Room - Book-signing for Friday morning authors
    12:30-2:00 Break for Lunch

    2-2:45 Town Center Legacy Room JAY ERSKINE LEUTZE

    2-2:45 Design Gallery MALAIKA KING ALBRECHT - Write Yourself: The Poetry of Healing - Expand understanding and application of the poetic process as an instrument for healing. A form of cognition, poetry associatively connects the concrete to the psychic and is a means of sorting through life events. The creative process of poetry works gently to move us through the layers of denial and “old tapes” toward clarity, a new voice. The use of metaphor permits re-living of events without re-traumatization. From poems that address unfinished conversations with loved ones or abusers to poems that use an elevated voice to reach for strength, participants will write and get a chance to use what Joseph Campbell calls “the eloquence within.” There will be several writing prompts and chances for participants to embrace the transformative power of their own creativity.

    2-2:45 Town Hall CHRISTINE HALE - Telling the Truth with Fiction:   Looking at the counter-intuitive element in the genre.  Although fiction is "made up," there's a powerful element of truth-telling in it.  And, although memoirists can and should struggle for factual accuracy in their writing, good memoir relies on a good capacity for imagination. A brief reading from her work, followed by brief lecture, discussion and Q&A.

    2-2:45 1st Baptist Church TOMMY HAYS - On Memory and Place in Tommy’s novels.

    2-4:45 Workshop - Memoir Writing with KATEY SCHULTZ.  $25 - advance registration required - see Workshop page for details.

    STILL FRIDAY AFTERNOON....

    3-3:45 Town Center Legacy Room NC POET LAUREATE JOSEPH BATHANTI - A Reading

    3-3:45 Design Gallery AMY WILLOUGHBY BURLE - The Poetry of Simple Prose: Simple language can sing a beautiful song.  The beauty of ordinary language can be extraordinary indeed as it raises the colloquial to eloquent, illustrating the beauty and magic of everyday life while elevating the reader with the feeling that "these are the words I use, this is the language I know, look how beautiful my experience is as well." Discussion and Q and A with sample readings from Out Across the Nowhere, short stories.

    3-3:45 1st Baptist Church GORDON McKINNEY:  "The Civil War in the Western North Carolina and the Origin of the Region's Republican Party"  - The Civil War in western North Carolina was a bitter battle among civilians and between soldiers and civilians that left lasting antagonisms. When the War ended, western North Carolina political leaders of both parties sought to use these feelings to their advantage. The Republican party offered a home to those who supported the Union or engaged in anti-Confederate activities. In many locations, this dissatisfied group formed a majority of voters.  
    MICHAEL C. HARDY:  "A People without Monuments is a People without Heroes" - Remembering the Civil War in Appalachian North Carolina. Since 1868, more than one hundred monuments honoring the deeds of Confederate and Union soldiers have graced North Carolina’s cemeteries, courthouses, and battlefields. Many of these have appeared in the eastern and piedmont section of the Old North State. The Appalachian counties of western North Carolina have received their fair share of these markers, but in total number of monuments erected, they remain behind the rest of the state. Was this due in part to the supposed pro-Union feelings of this section of the state, or more a result of the economics of the time period? Join Michael C. Hardy as he explores the attitudes of western North Carolinians and the work of groups like the United Confederate Veterans, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and the Grand Army of the Republic in their efforts to remember and commemorate the American Civil War in Appalachian North Carolina.

    4-4:45 Design Gallery NC POET LAUREATE JOSEPH BATHANTI - Writing Across Genres: Joseph Bathanti will talk about mining and writing about the same subjects in three different genres, poetry, fiction and memoir. He will also read selections from his work that exemplify this practice.

    4-4:45 Off The Beaten Path BOOK CLUB BUZZ with KAT TURCZYN, JANE WILLIG & NANCY ROTH
    Just when you think it's safe to walk into the bookstore....here come the three wacky broads with this year's batch of seriously wonderful talk about reading, writing, and books, books, books.  What do you love or abhor about your reading life?  Are you a Nook Person?  A Paperback Aficionado? A NYT Bestseller Addict? Only read regional?  Poetry or non-fiction?  Looking for like-minded souls to start a bookclub?  This is a no-rules free-for-all about everything we love about books and reading.

    4-4:45 TRAC Gallery ARTIST/ILLUSTRATOR DEBBIE LITTLEDEER - Children's books are often a beautiful mixture of words and pictures. The Rabbits Dance is such a book. In this informal Q&A session illustrator Debbie Littledeer will talk about the origins and progression of this collaboration between her and her longtime friend Ellie Kirby. She will also show examples of work on the book from beginning to end.

    STILL FRIDAY AFTERNOON....

    5-5:30 Town Center Legacy Room - Book-signing with Friday Afternoon Authors

    5:30-7 TRAC Gallery - Reception for Debbie Littledeer

    7:30 pm Town Center Legacy Room - Free Performance
    IVY ROWE
    from the novel "Fair and Tender Ladies" by Lee Smith
    with
    BARBARA BATES SMITH
    and
    musician Jeff Sebens




    SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 6

    9-9:45 Town Center Legacy Room  Panel Discussion: Path from Writer to Reader - If you have ever wondered how a writer's manuscript becomes a published book, this discussion is for you.  Members of the panel will lead us along the traditional path: from manuscript to agent, agent to publisher, publisher to bookseller, bookseller to reader. Plus we'll explore the alternative on-line route. Join us -- share your experiences, ask your questions.
    Panel members
    William Boggess, literary agent for Barer Literary in New York
    Kathy Pories, editor at Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
    Kevin Watson, founding editor of Press 53 in Winston Salem
    Caroline Christopoulus, bookseller at Malaprop’s in Asheville
    Ruth Price, experienced at online publishing

    9-11:45 Workshop - Memoir Writing with GRETCHEN GRIFFITH  $25 - advance registration required - see Workshop page for details.

    10-10:45 Town Center Legacy Room HEATHER NEWTON - Reading from and discussion of her novel UNDER THE MERCY TREES, winner of the 2011 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award, about a man forced to return home to western North Carolina and face his past when his older brother goes missing from the family home place.  Jill McCorkle has described UNDER THE MERCY TREES as "An amazing 
    novel, driven by mystery, and weaving past and present stories into an intricate and mesmerizing design... An extraordinary piece of work."

    10-10:45 Design Gallery MALAIKA KING ALBRECHT - Write Yourself: The Poetry of Healing - Expand understanding and application of the poetic process as an instrument for healing. A form of cognition, poetry associatively connects the concrete to the psychic and is a means of sorting through life events. The creative process of poetry works gently to move us through the layers of denial and “old tapes” toward clarity, a new voice. The use of metaphor permits re-living of events without re-traumatization. From poems that address unfinished conversations with loved ones or abusers to poems that use an elevated voice to reach for strength, participants will write and get a chance to use what Joseph Campbell calls “the eloquence within.” There will be several writing prompts and chances for participants to embrace the transformative power of their own creativity.

    10-10:45 Town Hall RICHARD CHESS will read some new and old work, including a piece or two written in response to the recent conflict in Israel and Gaza.

    10-10:45 1st Baptist Church  GORDON McKINNEY: "Senators Zebulon B. Vance and Henry W. Blair and Federal Assistance for Western North Carolina"  - Zebulon Vance and Henry Blair were United States Senators together from 1878 to 1891. Despite the fact that one was a former Confederate soldier, from North Carolina, and a Democrat and the other a former Union soldier, from New Hampshire, and a Republican, they worked together to help western North Carolina. This did this by supporting legislation that sought to eradicate illiteracy.

    MICHAEL C. HARDY: "Where Have all the Unionists Gone?" - The Role of Dissidents in Western North Carolina During the Civil War. For decades, the cry of "Unionist" has plagued the Civil War history of western North Carolina. Yet a careful reading of the available sources paints a different picture. Even many who did cross the line from the Confederate army were not motivated by a desire to preserve the Union, but simply wanted the protection afforded by the Federal government when they chose to take part in Union activities that included returning home to raid neighboring farms. Many others were dissidents, just trying to survive war-time laws that were attempting to force them into the army. Join historian Michael C. Hardy as he delves into the time period and literature to examine the loyalties of the western North Carolina mountains.

    STILL SATURDAY MORNING....

    11-11:45 Town Center Legacy Room JAY ERSKINE LEUTZE

    11-11:45 1st Baptist Church TERRY ROBERTS - Roberts’ debut novel, A Short Time to Stay Here, is set in Western North Carolina during World War I, echoing events of 100 years ago.  This novel, described by Robert Morgan, as “a thrilling story of the clash of cultures, of mystery, espionage, revenge, and love” won both the Willie Morris Prize for Southern Fiction and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for the best novel by a North Carolinian.  Join the author for a brief lecture on the sources of the novel’s characters, a short reading, followed by discussion with the audience.  For more information about the novel, visit the web site at www.ashorttimetostayhere.com .  Brief lecture, short reading, and Q & A

    11-11:45 Town Hall MARILYN McVICKER and CATHY LARSON SKY - ACROSS THE FINISHING LINE: a reading by two poets who draw from their backgrounds as performance artists to add depth and meaning to their readings. Marilyn brings pantomime and signing to her work, while Cathy weaves Irish fiddle tunes between poems. Each unlocks her own Pandora’s box of memories and insights to craft art from love, loss, family, beauty, and struggle – the raw material of existence. Marilyn and Cathy are lifelong writers who participate in the process of soulful writing, striving to give birth to words. They are pleased to be part of the Carolina Mountains Literary Festival this year, as they celebrate the 2014 publishing of their chapbooks, Some Shimmer of You (McVicker), and Blue egg, my heart (Sky) by Finishing Line Press of Georgetown, Kentucky.

    11-11:45 Off The Beaten Path PAT RIVIERE-SEEL - The Intersection of Memory and Imagination: Crafting poems from our memories can be slippery business. “Who the Hell cares about Anne Sexton’s grandmother,” W.H. Auden famously complained after a poetry reading. And, yes, the worst defense of a poem is still, “it really happened.” Richard Hugo said that the subject that initiates a poem “should trigger the imagination as well as the poem.” So, how do we use our memories to trigger our imagination and write the poems that need to be written? Join Pat for a reading and discussion on crafting poems from memories.

    Saturday afternoon, September 6

    12-12:30 Town Center Legacy Room Book-signing for Saturday Morning authors
    12:30-2:00 BREAK FOR LUNCH


    2-2:45 Town Center Legacy Room HEATHER NEWTON - Readings from and discussion of the linked short stories in her collection, MCMULLEN CIRCLE, which explore the intertwined lives of faculty families at the McMullen Boarding School in Tonola Falls, Georgia in 1969-70. The school community is isolated and idyllic, yet issues of race and the Vietnam War still intrude. Stories in this collection have appeared in The Drum, The Great Smokies Review, O, Georgia! and elsewhere.

    2-2:45 Design Gallery CHRISTINE HALE - Using the Imagination in Memoir: Looking at the counter-intuitive element in the genre. Although fiction is "made up," there's a powerful element of truth-telling in it. And, although memoirists can and should struggle for factual accuracy in their writing, good memoir relies on a good capacity for imagination. A brief reading from her work, followed by brief lecture, discussion and Q&A.

    2-2:45 Town Hall MARILYN McVICKER and CATHY LARSON SKY - ACROSS THE FINISHING LINE: a reading by two poets who draw from their backgrounds as performance artists to add depth and meaning to their readings. Marilyn brings pantomime and signing to her work, while Cathy weaves Irish fiddle tunes between poems. Each unlocks her own Pandora’s box of memories and insights to craft art from love, loss, family, beauty, and struggle – the raw material of existence. Marilyn and Cathy are lifelong writers who participate in the process of soulful writing, striving to give birth to words.  They are pleased to be part of the Carolina Mountains Literary Festival this year, as they celebrate the 2014 publishing of their chapbooks, Some Shimmer of You (McVicker), and Blue egg, my heart (Sky) by Finishing Line Press of Georgetown, Kentucky.

    2-2:45 Off The Beaten Path BOOK CLUB BUZZ with KAT TURCZYN, JANE WILLIG, & NANCY ROTH
    Just when you think it's safe to walk into the bookstore....here come the three wacky broads with this year's batch of seriously wonderful talk about reading, writing, and books, books, books.  What do you love or abhor about your reading life?  Are you a Nook Person?  A Paperback Aficionado? A NYT Bestseller Addict? Only read regional?  Poetry or non-fiction?  Looking for like-minded souls to start a bookclub?  This is a no-rules free-for-all about everything we love about books and reading.

    2-4:45 Workshop - Poetry - with RICHARD CHESS   $25 - advance registration required - see Workshop page for details.

    STILL SATURDAY AFTERNOON....

    3-3:45 Town Center Legacy Room GLENIS REDMOND

    3-3:45 Design Gallery GRETCHEN GRIFFITH - *The Art of Storycatching - *Self-proclaimed storycatcher Gretchen Griffith shares her experiences and methods of capturing and preserving life stories of people in western North Carolina. Through her narration, the ordinary became the extraordinary, and their stories became powerful. She will also read from her books, bringing to life all kinds of personalities she uncovered.

    3-3:45 Town Hall TERRY ROBERTS - Roberts’ debut novel, A Short Time to Stay Here, is set in Western North Carolina during World War I, echoing events of 100 years ago.  This novel, described by Robert Morgan, as “a thrilling story of the clash of cultures, of mystery, espionage, revenge, and love” won both the Willie Morris Prize for Southern Fiction and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for the best novel by a North Carolinian.  Join the author for a brief lecture on the sources of the novel’s characters, a short reading, followed by discussion with the audience.  For more information about the novel, visit the web site at www.ashorttimetostayhere.com .

    3-3:45 TRAC Gallery DEBBIE LITTLEDEER- Children's books are often a beautiful mixture of words and pictures. The Rabbits Dance is such a book. In this informal Q&A session illustrator Debbie Littledeer will talk about the origins and progression of this collaboration between her and her longtime friend Ellie Kirby. She will also show examples of work on the book from beginning to end.

    4-4:45 Town Center Legacy Room TRADITIONAL VOICES GROUP EXHIBIT with NANCI MANSFIELD, Editor  - Watch the Memory Minutes movie, and learn how this project got started, who participates, and the most-asked question: why don't they use their voices?  Short video clips, do's and don't's they've discovered along the way while preserving for the future the memories of the old ways.

    4-4:45 Design Gallery JIM ROGERS - A reading of Starts And Stops Along The Way: Sharing Some Stuff From The Road Most Travel, a a thematic collection of free verse poems and paragraphical narratives about the discovery and process, the trials and tribulations, smiles and giggles, regrets and regards, successes and failures, sad and happy memories, all from the road most travel, as told by those long on the journey.  There's also an invitation to others to journal the journey and stay connected to your best traveling partner, yourself.

    5-5:30 Town Center Legacy Room BOOK-SIGNING for Saturday Afternoon Authors

    7pm Town Center Legacy Room
    Banquet with Keynote Speaker
    GLENIS REDMOND
    Let's Remember Dinner on the Ground
    Usually a church homecoming event, dinner on the ground meant tables piled with plates
    of food from kitchen gardens and barnyards and people gathered in celebration and remembrance.
    Ours will be not be very different with local food from local farmers prepared with care just for us
    by Chef Eric Brown, as we celebrate authors, readers, and each other.

    RE-MEM-BER-ING

    Glenis Redmond believes to re-mem-ber is the most powerful type of stitching.
    It is a purposeful bringing together. During this keynote, she will name the beauties and the
    struggles of the past. Yet she knows coming from a Middle Passage lineage that there are
    some facts that will always remain unanswered. She does not stop her poetic laboring.
    She uses the mystical strands of her imagination to enter the realm of the unknown.
    During this keynote, Glenis’ voice will invite you to do your own remembering
    and walk alongside her as she journeys.


    Genealogy Mus tek cyear a de root fa heal de tree. — Gullah proverb

    I can only beget

    so much — wrestling


    with limb break

    and early leaf fall.

    So, I bend my body

    in both work

    & prayer. Pull

    & dig stories up

    by the root.

    Plunk them down,


    water & turn

    green verse


    walking between

    the worlds.

    Tickets required - $30
    See registration page for details or to pay with PayPal