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    2010 Authors


    Tony Earley 
    (Saturday Banquet Keynote)  
    Tony Earley  was born in San Antonio, Texas, but grew up in North Carolina where his stories are often set, as are his novels Jim the Boy and The Blue Star(Read the New York Times Review here.)
    Earley studied English at Warren Wilson College and after graduation in 1983, he spent four years as a reporter in North Carolina. Later he attended the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, where he received an MFA in creative writing. 
    In 1996, Earley's short stories earned him a place on Granta's list of the "20 Best Young American Novelists", and shortly after that announcement, The New Yorker featured him in an issue that focused on the best new novelists in America. He has twice been included in the annual Best American Short Stories anthology. 


    Paul Cuadros 
      
    (Friday Morning Keynote)

    Paul Cuadros's family moved to the United States from Peru in 1960. An award-winning investigative reporter, he has written for Time magazine and Salon.com, among others. In 1999 Cuadros won an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellowship to write about the impact of the large numbers of Latino poultry workers in rural towns in the South. He moved to Pittsboro, North Carolina, to conduct his research and stayed on to document the growing Latino community in the Southeast. His book A Home on the Fieldis about faith, loyalty, and trust. It is a parable in the tradition of Stand and Deliver and Hoosiers—a story of one team and their accidental coach who became certain heroes to the whole community.

    Alan Gratz
     
    is the author of one of the ALA's 2007 Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults, Samurai Shortstop (Dial 2006), and a 2008 ALA Quick Pick for Young Adult Readers, Something Rotten (Dial 2007). A sequel,Something Wicked (Dial 2008), now out in paperback. His latest book is The Brooklyn Nine (Dial 2009), a middle grade novel about family, baseball, and American history. He lives with his wife and daughter in Bakersville, North Carolina. Visit hiswebsite.

    Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
     
    was born in Cherokee, North Carolina. A 1999 graduate of Smoky Mountain High School, Annette earned her B.A. from Yale University in 2003 with a degree in American Studies and Secondary English. She also earned a M.A. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary. After completing her education, Annette came home to Cherokee to work for the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and as an assistant to Principal Chief Michell Hicks. She currently teaches English at Swain County High School. Annette writes poetry, children’s literature, and fiction. As a student, her poetry was published and most recently, a series of three children’s books written by her and illustrated by Cherokee artists were released through the Principal Chief’s Children’s Book Project. Annette lives with her husband Evan, son Ross, and two dogs in Cherokee, NC.

    Brian Lee Knopp 
    is the bestselling author of Mayhem in Mayberry: Misadventures of a P.I. in Southern Appalachia.  Knopp has provided legal support investigations, both criminal and civil, for over twenty years in North Carolina. His clients have ranged from huge corporate law firms to the indigent. He is a former professional sheep shearer with an M.A. degree in English Literature from The University of Texas at Austin. For the past twenty-one years he has lived in the mountains north of Asheville, North Carolina. His book reviews and essays have been published in several regional magazines and local media. As a licensed P.I., sheep shearer, and avid outdoorsman, he has roamed extensively throughout western North Carolina.

    Cathy Smith Bowers 
    North Carolina's recently appointed Poet Laureate, teaches at both UNC Asheville and Queens University in Charlotte.  
    Bowers' poems have been published widely, from The Atlantic Monthly to The Kenyon Review. She has written three collections of poetry: The Love That Ended Yesterday in Texas (winner of the Texas Tech University Press Poetry Award Series); Traveling in Time of Danger; and A Book of Minutes.  Bowers is also a much-lauded teacher. She received the J.B. Fuqua Distinguished Educator Award in 2002.
    Chris Hollifield 
    is a native of Spruce Pine, North Carolina, where he teaches North Carolina History to 8th Graders at Harris Middle School. A veteran teacher, Hollifield was the 2009-2010 Mitchell County Teacher of the Year. Hollifield holds a BA Degree in History from Mars Hill College. An avid North Carolina and local history buff, Hollifield has collected pictures and historical documents for many years. He and co-author and producer, David Biddix first teamed up to produce a DVD documentary for Central Baptist Church’s 75th Anniversary in 2007. In 2009 they published Images of America: Spruce Pine, as part of Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series. Images of America: Little Switzerland is the latest work of Chris Hollifield and David Biddix, released in June, this work was published to coincide with the Little Switzerland Centennial Celebration in June, 2010. 

    Christopher Blake
    's Linville Gorge Wilderness Area came out from Arcadia in 2008. It followed an earlier title of his, the 2005 River of Cliffs:a Linville Gorge Reader (Parkway Pubs) now, alas, out
    of print.  He is the publicist for the Toe River Arts Council and a former college English instructor who specialized in W.B. Yeats in his doctoral work at Georgia State. He has edited and published work by William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg. Blake is also director of the Friends of Linville Gorge, a non-profit with no 501-c papers, no website, no dues, and all inclusive world membership, including you. They maintain the Devils' Hole Trail on the east side of the Gorge and promote sane and decent use of this great wilderness which is within walking distance of the cabin where he writes.

    Colby Martin
     
    realized his passion for writing at an early age. By 13, he had completed his first novel and by 18 had five tucked away on a shelf. Now as an emerging Western North Carolina author, Colby has trail blazed to the reading public’s eyes through a series of articles published weekly in the Yancey Common Times Journal about local residents and the triumphs and challenges facing them over the last 100 years. Additionally authoring such works as “The Beautiful Room” and “The Famine,” he has furthermore harnessed his love for writing by carving a career for himself in grant writing and administration.

    David Biddix
    , a native of Spruce Pine, North Carolina, is Webmaster/Coordinator of Multimedia at Mayland Community College. He is a graduate of UNC-Chapel Hill, where he earned a degree in Radio/Television/Motion Pictures and of Western Carolina University, with a Master of Public Affairs degree. A love of local history and its preservation led him to form Longleaf Media with Chris Hollifield (www.longleafmedia.com) in 2008. The company has produced two titles in Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series for Spruce Pine and Little Switzerland, plus Longleaf Media has released its first documentary DVD This is the place…Little Switzerland in June, 2010, with plans to produce future documentaries for Spruce Pine and Mitchell County. In addition to preserving local history, Biddix enjoys reading, college basketball, and spending time with his family.

    Elizabeth Baird Hardy 
     who grew up in Kentucky in a family ofstorytellers , teaches English at Mayland Community College where she was awarded the 2006 Excellence in Teaching award. She is the
    author of Milton, Spenser, and the Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the C.S. Lewis Novels (McFarland 2007) and contributed two chapters to the recently released Twilight and History (Wiley 1010). A popular speaker, she has appeared at national literary conferences and is also a storyteller and historic interpreter who brings to life history, literature, and Appalachian culture for students and audiences of all sizes. She works closely with her husband, Michael C. Hardy, the region’s premier Civil War author and historian. They live with their children on the side of a mountain in Avery County.

    George Ivey
     was born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina, and graduated from Duke University with a degree in political science. He spent his first years out of college working for United States Senator Terry Sanford in Washington, D.C., serving as a legislative aide for environment and energy issues. He then spent more than seven years with The Nature Conservancy, including three years coordinating a community-based conservation program to benefit the Conasauga River. He then served more than six years as the Director of Development and North Carolina Office Director for Friends of Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Waynesville, North Carolina. More recently, George has published his first novel, Up River: A Novel of Attempted Restoration. He has also written a short story, "Creekside Conspiracies," which was a finalist for the 2009 Doris Betts Fiction Prize. This same story was also selected for inclusion in the forthcoming anthology,Echoes Across the Blue Ridge

    Gina Farago 
    Winner of the New York Book Festival Award, the Benjamin Franklin Silver award, and top finalist for the Compton Crook and IPPY awards, Gina Farago is the author of Ivy Cole and the Moon and Luna, the first books in the 
    Ivy Cole werewolf series. Her studies have included research on werewolf legends and lore, and personal interaction with a gray wolf pack, observing first-hand the animals' social behavior and hunting techniques.  Farago's other works include coauthoringMaking Do: How to Cook Like a Mountain MeMa with Lois Sutphin. She lives in North Carolina with her husband, Karl, and their numerous four-legged friends. When not busy writing, Farago volunteers with her therapy dog, Skittles.

    Hal McDonald
     is a Professor of English at Mars Hill College. In January, 2007, he won Court TV’s “Search for the Next Great Crime Writer” contest, and had his winning entry, The Anatomists, published by Harper Collins the following year. Having been primarily a writer of regional fiction and poetry for most of his adult life, The Anatomistsis his first foray into detective fiction. He is currently at work on a sequel to The Anatomists titled The Death Hunters. A long-time resident of Western North Carolina, McDonald lives in Asheville with his wife Nancy, and their children Hillary, Lawson, and Eleanor.
    Holly Iglesias
     teaches in the Master of Liberal Arts Program at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. She has two poetry collections, Souvenirs of a Shrunken World (Kore Press, 2008) and Angles of Approach (White Pine Press, forthcoming in 2011), and a critical work, Boxing Inside the Box: Women's Prose Poetry (Quale Press, 2004). She has published translations of the poems of award-winning Cuban poet, Caridad Atencio. Her current projects are Walking to Cuba, poems based on her experiences as a transplanted Midwesterner in the Cuban exile community in Miami, and Boom, which looks at civil defense manuals aimed at housewives in the 1950s.  She is a recipient of the  2009–2010 North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship Award.

    Janice Willis Barnett
    ’s love of writing comes from growing up around mountain people who spent about as much time telling tales as they did being awake. Her first book, Unicoi and Limestone Cove, an Arcadia Images of America book, came out Dec. 2009. Her short stories, essays, articles, and poems have appeared in numerous publications. Janice’s essays also air frequently on West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s “Inside Appalachia.” She is a freelance columnist and feature writer for Unicoi County, Tennessee’s The Erwin Record. T
    hough she lives across the mountain in Unicoi, Tennessee in the county where she was born, friends tell Janice that she has western North Carolina “written all over her.” This may be because both her Higgins and Willis ancestors came from Yancey County.

    Jean Boone Benfield 
    was born and raised in western North Carolina and is a descendant of Israel Boone, brother of American frontiersman Daniel.  Her ancestors came to America in the seventeenth century and were among the first settlers in Buncombe County.  Proud of her rural heritage, she preserves through the remembrances in her book Mountain Born (2009) a chronicle of country life during the 1940s and 1950s.  Her interests are history, etymology, place names, and surnames in the southern Applachians.  She lives in Asheville, NC with her husband and Welsh corgi.

    Jeff Davis 
    attended UNC-Greensboro’s MFA program, recieved his Master’s Degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and apprenticed to a Kwakwaka’wakh carver of ceremonial masks and totem poles in Alert Bay, British Columbia, from 1971 to 1975. He later taught Anthropology and History at UNC-Asheville. His poems have appeared in Lillabulero, Iron, Asheville Poetry Review, the Nantahala Review, and other little magazines. His books include Transits of Venus (2005), and NatureS: Selected Poems, 1972 – 2005 (2006). Since 2005 he has hosted the radio program Wordplay, which celebrates poets and writers of creative prose; it’s now available each Sunday at 5:00 PM via AshevilleFM.org, and a catalog of the show archive is at naturespoetry.blogspot.com. He is a member of the advisory board of the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center.

    Joseph Bathanti is a professor of creative writing & co-director of Appalachian State University's Visiting Writers Series. His collection of short stories, The High Heart, was chosen as the St. Andrews College (Laurinburg, N.C.) One Book, One Community 2008 Summer Reading Book. This year, he received the 100 Scholars Research Award given annually by ASU to recognize exemplary research or creative activities of a tenured faculty member.  He's now writing the second novel in a trilogy that began with the novel, East Liberty, set in the nearly vanished little Italy in Pittsburgh where he grew up.  His novel, Coventry, won the 2006 Novello Literary Award. His poetry collection, Land of Amnesia, was published by Press53.  He is a recipient of the  2009–2010 North Carolina Arts Council Fellowship Award.

    Judy Goldman’s two novels are:  Early Leaving (called “masterfully written and fast-paced… highly recommended” by Library Journal) and The Slow Way Back (Sir Walter Raleigh Fiction Award, Mary Ruffin Poole First Fiction Award, finalist for SIBA”s Novel of the Year).  She’s published two prize-winning poetry collections.  Her honors:  Mary Frances Hobson Prize for “distinguished achievement in arts and letters,” Fortner Writer and Community Award for “outstanding generosity to other writers and the larger community,” and the Beverly D. Clark Author Award from Queens University.

    Karen Chávez 
     
    is an editor for the Asheville Citizen-Times newspaper, directing coverage of outdoor recreation, environmental and health and fitness issues. She is also the author of Best Hikes with Dogs: North Carolina (The
    Mountaineers Books, 2007). A native of New York, she has a degree in environmental studies from the State University of New York at Binghamton and a master’s in journalism from the University of Montana. She is a former ranger with the National Park Service and has lived and hiked in the mountains of Western North Carolina with her black Lab, Shelby, since 2000.

    Kathryn Newfont 
    (Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2001) specializes in U.S. History, where she has broad interests in environmental history, women’s history, regional studies, and oral history. Convinced that Appalachian history is important to U.S. History and beyond, she spends much of her time working with the rich Southern Appalachian Archives in the college’s Ramsey Center for Regional Studies. Her research centers on the history of Southern Appalachian forests and the people they have sustained. She is currently working on a book project focused on twentieth-century forest politics in the mountains of Western North Carolina. Her book Commons Environmentalism will be published next year by University of Georgia Press. 

    Kristen & Stephanie Whitson are co-authors of the historical non-fiction novel Red Hill: The Untold Story of the Whitson Brothers and the Murder of Kit Byrd. Originally instigated by an inquest into their own family history, their current book, Red Hill, expanded to explore the post-Civil War history and culture of Mitchell and Yancey Counties. Both authors are graduates of Vanderbilt University and are currently university professors of physics and chemistry at the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga. Identical twins and lifelong residents of East Tennessee, they have always enjoyed reading, researching, and spending time with relatives in and around Red Hill. They are also the authors of several peer-reviewedscientific journal articles and short stories.

    Laura Hope-Gill
     is the Director of Asheville Wordfest, a free poetry festival which Frank X Walker calls “the new shining star in the poetry scene.” Her first collection of poems is a collaboration with photographer John Fletcher, Jr., entitled The Soul Tree: Poems and Photographs of the Southern Appalachians (Grateful Steps Press, 2009).  Laura has most recently founded, with Trey Moore, Liz Bradfield, Ravi Shankar and Linda Hogan, The Poetry Action Response Team (PART), an effort to merge poetry and citizen journalism in response to environmental disaster and social injustice. She holds an MFA in Poetry from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and is an NC Arts Fellow for her nonfiction writings on deafness. She has recently produced a series of short videos in which she explores creative alchemy as the foundation for the world's religions. They can be viewed on her website
    .

    Michael C. Hardy
     is one of North Carolina’s best known Civil War historians. Not only does he have numerous books and articles to his credit, but he also writes and edits a blog on North Carolina during the war years. Michael’s latest book,North Carolina Remembers Gettysburg, a compilation of first-person accounts of the famous battle, is being released by Ten Roads Publishing in 2010. He lives in western North Carolina with his wife, renowned literary critic Elizabeth Baird Hardy, and their children, Nathaniel and Isabella. You can learn more by visiting his web site at www.michaelchardy.com

    Peggy Poe Stern
     grew up on small farm in the Appalachians near Jefferson, NC; married young; finished school; made handcrafted folk toys; established her own farm on Grandfather Mountain near Boone; raised six children in a single-wide while growing burley tobacco, Christmas trees, and small fruits; built a house; raised small animals – all – while helping her husband do land surveying. Now, still farming, she enjoys her grand and great-grandchildren while creating novels sprinkled with the flavor of her mountain heritage. Her thirteenth novel, Running Wild (about a girl who lives in a cave and is sequel to Wild Thing) should be available at the Festival.

    Contemporary fiction writer, Rose Senehi, is noted for weaving environmental themes into her romantic thrillers. Her novel, In the Shadows of Chimney Rock is nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award by members of the Southern Independent Bookseller’s Alliance as the Best in Southern Literature for the year. Now a resident of Chimney Rock, NC, she moved to Murrells Inlet, SC, from Upstate New York in 1996. Her first novel, Shadows in the Grass was published in 2001, her second, Windfall, in 2002, and her third, Pelican Watch in 2006. Her fifth novel, The Wind in the Wood, that came out in April of 2010. Visit her website.

    Tommy Hays
    's latest novel, The Pleasure Was Mine (St. Martin’s Press), was chosen for the One City, One Book program in Greensboro, North Carolina and for the Amazing Read—Greenville, SC’s first community read. Read on NPR’s “Radio Reader”, it was a Finalist for the SIBA 2006 Fiction Award. His other novels are Sam’s Crossing (Atheneum) and In the Family Way (Random House), winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program and Lecturer in the Master of Liberal Arts Program at the University of North Carolina Asheville. He also teaches in the Master of Fine Arts Creative Writing Program at Murray State University.

    Wayne Winkler
     is the Director of WETS-FM, East Tennessee State University’s public radio station. A native of Detroit, Winkler received his B.A. in Communications from ETSU in 1988 and received his M.A. in History in 1993. He is president of the Melungeon Historical Society, and the author of Walking Toward the SunsetThe Melungeons of Appalachia (2003, Mercer University Press). Winkler lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee with his wife Andrea and their children Claire and Josef.
    2009 Authors
    Alan Gratz is the author of one of the ALA's 2007 Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults, Samurai Shortstop (Dial 2006), and a 2008 ALA Quick Pick for Young Adult Readers, Something Rotten (Dial 2007). A sequel, Something Wicked (Dial 2008), makes its paperback debut this month. His latest book is The Brooklyn Nine (Dial 2009), a middle grade novel about family, baseball, and American history. He lives with his wife and daughter in Bakersville, North Carolina. Visit his website.
    Ann Pancake
     grew up in Romney and Summersville, WV. Her first novel, Strange As This Weather Has Been (Counterpoint 2007), features a southern West Virginia family devastated by mountaintop removal mining. Based on interviews and real events, the novel was one of KirkusReview's Top Ten Fiction Books of 2007, won the 2007 Weatherford Award, and was a finalist for the 2008 Orion Book Award.
       Pancake's collection of short stories, Given Ground, won the 2000 Bakeless award, and she has also received a Whiting Award, an NEA Grant, a Pushcart Prize, and creative writing fellowships from the states of Washington, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania. Her fiction and essays have appeared in journals and anthologies like Glimmer TrainPoets andWritersNarrative, and New Stories from the South. She earned her BA in English at West Virginia University and a PhD. in English Literaturefrom the University of Washington. Currently, she teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University.
    Visit her website. 

    Annette Saunooke Clapsaddle
     was born in Cherokee, North Carolina.  A 1999 graduate of Smoky Mountain High School, Annette earned her B.A. from Yale University in 2003 with a degree in American Studies and Secondary English.  She also earned a M.A. in American Studies from the College of William and Mary.  After completing her education, Annette came home to Cherokee to work for the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and as an assistant to Principal Chief Michell Hicks. She currently teaches English at Swain County High School.  Annette writes poetry, children’s literature, and fiction.  As a student, her poetry was published and most recently, a series of three children’s books written by her and illustrated by Cherokee artists were released through the Principal Chief’s Children’s Book Project.  Annette lives with her husband Evan, infant son Ross, and two dogs in Cherokee, NC. 

    Dr. Betty Jamerson Reed
    a native of WNC, is an educator by profession but continues to pursue her life-long interest in writing. She is the author of poems, short stories, essays and non-fiction. Involved in on-going research regarding Latino, African American, and Asian communities of WNC, Betty collects local histories from residents of the region. A member of the Appalachian Studies Association, she wrote The Brevard Rosenwald School: Black Education and Community Building in a Southern Appalachian Town, 1920-1966 (2004, McFarland Publishers), which won a certificate of commendation by the American Association for State and Local History. 
    Beth Cagle Burt
     co-editor of Kakalak Anthology of Carolina Poets and short prose journal moonShine review, has served as a newspaper reporter, college educator, and writing consultant. She has received several poetry awards in national contests including first place for poetry chapbook, The Fearless Tattoo. Featured photographer for two literary journals, Beth’s poems and photographs have appeared in journals in the US, the UK, and Australia including New York Quarterly, Slipstream, Tulane Review, Blue Collar Review, Main Street Rag, Iodine Poetry Journal, Palo Alto ReviewMaelstrom, Monas Hieroglyphic, and others. Her poetry chapbook is available here. 

    Bruce Stewart
    Colby Martin
     
    realized his passion for writing at an early age. By 13, he had completed his first novel and by 18 had five tucked away on a shelf. Now as an emerging Western North Carolina author, Colby has trail blazed to the reading public’s eyes through a series of articles published weekly in the Yancey Common Times Journal about local residents and the triumphs and challenges facing them over the last 100 years. Additionally authoring such works as “The Beautiful Room” and “The Famine,” he has furthermore harnessed his love for writing by carving a career for himself in grant writing and administration.
    Dale Mettam is a writer currently living a stone’s throw away from Raleigh, NC.  He’s written a novel, a bunch of comic-books, as well as a TV show pilot that’s currently in development out in Hollywood.  In addition to a movie script he’s wrestling (for a movie franchise you’ve heard of - but have probably never seen), there are comics in the pipeline from Hard Way Studios, Viper Comics, and Atomic Pop Art.  When he’s not writing, reading, attending conventions, being talked into editing scripts, or bouncing around ideas for new projects with people significantly more talented than he is, he writes bios about himself in the third person (and feels slightly strange about it).
    Dwayne Biddix  is the co-founder, co-creator, and penciler of Hard Way Studios, a comic book studio. Some of his credits include; penciling and co-creation of comic titles Morbid Myths, a title selected by Wizard Magazine as number 39 of the top 40 independent books of 2007, House at the Edge of Nowhere, The Supremacy, and Captor of Torments, as well as co-creator of all other titles from the studio. He is also responsible for various other jobs ranging from writing to editing to coloring.
    Eleanora E. Tate
     is the author of eleven novels for middle-grade readers, including her recent historical fiction novel Celeste's Harlem Renaissance, the 2007 AAUW North Carolina Book Award Winner for Juvenile Literature and a 2008 IRA Teachers' Choice Award winner. Her other North Carolina books are To Be Free and Don’t Split the Pole: Tales of Down-Home Folk Wisdom. Her award-winning, acclaimed South Carolina trilogy consists of The Secret of Gumbo Grove; Thank You, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.!, and A Blessing in Disguise. In addition to her fiction, Ms. Tate is the author of the biography African American Musicians, which was a major contributor to the book Black Stars of the Harlem Renaissance. She lives in Knightdale, NC, with the spirit of her beloved late husband Zack E. Hamlett, III. Her website.
    Elizabeth Ellison is a watercolorist-papermaker who has a gallery-studio in Bryson City, NC.  Ellison's pen-and-ink drawings and watercolor washes long have graced the work of her husband, writer/naturalist George Ellison, and others. Publishing venues include The Asheville Citizen-Times, Blue Ridge Outdoors, Outdoor Traveler, Friends of Wildlife, High Vistas, and Chinquapin. In September of 2006, The History Press (Charleston, SC) published Blue Ridge Nature Journal: Reflections on the Appalachians in Essays and Art by George and Elizabeth Ellison.  Her website.
    George Ellison who resides in Bryson City, NC,  wrote the biographical introductions for the reissues of two Appalachian classics: Horace Kephart’s Our Southern Highlanders  and James Mooney’s History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the  Cherokees. He writes a “Nature Journal” column for the Asheville Citizen-Times  and a regional history “Back Then” column for Smoky Mountain News. A selection of his "Back Then" columns published in 2005 by The History Press in Charleston, SC, as Mountain Passages: Natural and Cultural History of Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky MountainsHis website.

    Gloria Houston With a Ph. D. in interdisciplinary studies from the University of South Florida, Dr. Houston was faculty and Author-in-Residence there. A Rawlings Scholar for three years, ASU's Belk Distinguished Lecturer, and Distinguished Educator of the IRA, she presents writing and literature workshops internationally. She serves on the international Advisory Board for Computers across the World (CPAW) and is International Writers Week faculty.  Her best selling book, THE YEAR OF THE PERFECT CHRISTMAS TREE (Dial/Puffin) was a Best Book of the Decade by the American Library Association and is presented annually as an opera, a musical, and a ballet.
      Her website.

    Hal McDonald
     is a Professor of English at Mars Hill College. In January, 2007, he won Court TV’s “Search for the Next Great Crime Writer” contest, and had his winning entry, The Anatomists, published by Harper Collins the following year. Having been primarily a writer of regional fiction and poetry for most of his adult life, The Anatomists is his first foray into detective fiction. He is currently at work on a sequel to The Anatomists titled The Death Hunters. A long-time resident of Western North Carolina, McDonald lives in Asheville with his Wife Nancy, and their children Hillary, Lawson, and Eleanor.
    Jim Clark has published Notions: A Jim Clark Miscellany, two books of poems Dancing on Canaan's Ruins, and Handiwork, and has edited Fable in the Blood: The Selected Poems of Byron Herbert Reece.  His first full-lenght play The Girl with the Faraway Eye, was given a public staged reading at The Portland Actors Conservatory Theatre, Portland, OR. He also has several CDs of poems and Appalachian folk music: Buried LandThe Near Myths, and Words to Burn. His stories and poems have appeared in numerous anthologies, journals and magazines. He lives in Wilson, North Carolina, where he is Professor of Southern Literature, Writer-in-Residence at Barton College, and an editor of Crucible. His readings often include music and songs performed on the guitar, banjo, autoharp, and mountain dulcimer. His website.
    John Hoppenthaler
    ’s books of poetry are Lives Of Water (2003) and Anticipate the Coming Reservoir (2008), both titles from Carnegie Mellon University Press.  With Kazim Ali he has co-edited a book of critical essays on the poetry of Jean Valentine. He served as Personal Assistant to Toni Morrison for nine years and as Poetry Editor of Kestrel for twelve years.  He now teaches at East Carolina University.  Visit his university webpage.
    Joseph Dabney has received national attention for his books Mountain SpiritsMore Mountain SpiritsHERK and Smokehouse Ham, Spoon Bread & Scuppernong WineSmokehouse won the  prestigious James Beard Foundation's top book prize in 1999, “Cookbook of the Year,” considered the “Oscar” of food world literature. Dabney is now working on a “cultural cookbook” that will cover the coastal areas of the Carolinas and Georgia (2010). TIME Magazine described Dabney’s first book, Mountain Spirits as “a splendid and sometimes hilarious history” of the Southern Appalachian moonshine culture. Joe Dabney is a native of South Carolina, a graduate of Berry College and a veteran of the Korean War. He has homes in north Atlanta and at Euharlee in north Georgia where he  completed a novel set in the Cherokee Nation in the 1800’s. He is married to Susanne Knight  Dabney and they attend Dunwoody Baptist Church. 
    Judy Goldman
    ’s two novels are:  Early Leaving (called “masterfully written and fast-paced… highly recommended” by Library Journal) and The Slow Way Back (Sir Walter Raleigh Fiction Award, Mary Ruffin Poole First Fiction Award, finalist for SIBA”s Novel of the Year).  She’s published two prize-winning poetry collections.  Her honors:  Mary Frances Hobson Prize for “distinguished achievement in arts and letters,” Fortner Writer and Community Award for “outstanding generosity to other writers and the larger community,” and the Beverly D. Clark Author Award from Queens University.

    Karen Miller
     
     
     
     

    Katey Schultz
     writes from her home in Bakersville, North Carolina. Her work has appeared in Writers’ Dojo, Cadillac Cicatrix, Perigee, M Review, Southern Arts Journal, Now & Then and more. She edits for Silk Road, Main Street Rag, and Memoir (and). Her art essays appear regularly in national magazines. She is the author of Lost Crossings: A Contemplative Look at Western North Carolina's Historic Swinging Footbridges and edited the fiction anthology, Dots On a Map: A Collection of Small Town Stories. Visit her website
     for more information.

    Kevin Morgan Watson  is the founding editor of Press 53, a small, independent literary publishing company in Winston-Salem. As a publisher, he has worked with writers ranging from first-time published authors to winners of the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. As a writer, his short stories, poetry, and essays have appeared in numerous publications, including the 2002 TallGrass Writers Guild/Outrider Press anthology Take Two—They’re Small, where his short story “Sunny Side Up” won first prize. Kevin also serves as an advisor for student adaptation of short stories to screenplays with the screenwriting faculty at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, School of Filmmaking.

    Laura Hope-Gill
     is the Director of Asheville Wordfest, a free poetry festival which Frank X Walker calls “the new shining star in the poetry scene.” Her first collection of poems is a collaboration with photographer John Fletcher, Jr., entitled The Soul Tree: Poems and Photographs of the Southern Appalachians (Grateful Steps Press, 2009).  Laura has most recently founded, with Trey Moore, Liz Bradfield, Ravi Shankar and Linda Hogan, The Poetry Action Response Team (PART), an effort to merge poetry and citizen journalism in response to environmental disaster and social injustice. She holds an MFA in Poetry from the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and is an NC Arts Fellow for her nonfiction writings on deafness. She has recently produced a series of short videos in which she explores creative alchemy as the foundation for the world's religions. They can be viewed on her website
    .

    After several years spent in corporate communications and as an advertising copywriter, Lisa Zerkle 
    turned her attention to poetry.  Her work has appeared CruciblePinesongmoonShine reviewMain Street Rag and literarymama.com
    .   Her poems have earned awards from Press 53, North Carolina Poetry Society, Charlotte Writer’s Club and Jubilee Literary Arts Festival. In 2008, she served as a community columnist for The Charlotte Observer. Zerkle currently resides in Charlotte, NC with her husband and their three children.
    Mark Kneece published his first comic story in Alien Worlds in 1987. His credits include a story arc for Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight and a stint as the writer of Tarzan for the syndicated comic strip. He co-authored The Bristol Board Jungle (NBM Publishing) with Bob Pendarvis in 2003. The novel is based on his experience as a sequential art teacher. Kneece also wrote  a graphic novel entitled Trailers which was nominated for a YALSA Award. Most recently Kneece adapted 8 episodes of the Twilight Zone television series to graphic novel format for Walker Books.  Kneece came to Savannah College of Art and Design in 1993 to teach writing in the sequential art department.
    Marlin Barton
    's short stories have appeared in Shenandoah, The Virginia Quarterly Review, The Sewanee Review and The American Literary Review. "Jeremiah's Road," a story from his first collection The Dry Well was included in Prize Stories 1994: The O. Henry Awards. Barton was awarded an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Alabama State Council on the Arts in 2006, and received the Andrew Lytle Prize in 1995. Barton's debut novel A Broken Thing was published in 2003. A short story collection, Dancing by the River came out in 2005. Barton lives in Montgomery with his wife Rhonda. He is assistant director of the "Writing Our Stories" project, a program for juvenile offenders.
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    Michael Joslin
     has written about and photographed the mountain region for over 25 years.  He has published five books on Southern Appalachia, including Highland HandcraftersAppalachian Bounty, and Our Living Heritage, as well as hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles. He has taught at Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk, North Carolina, for 20 years.  He is a professor of humanities and communication arts and the Director of the Stephenson Center for Appalachia. He and his wife, Pam, live in the Buladean community of Mitchell County, North Carolina, where he works his draft horses, gardens, and wanders the woods.
    Pat Riviere-Seel
     is the author of two poetry collections,  The Serial Killer’s Daughter (Main Street Rag, 2009) and No Turning Back Now (Finishing Line Press, 2004). She is Associate Editor of Asheville Poetry Review and has taught poetry classes for UNCA’s Great Smokies Writing Program. A former political reporter for The Fayetteville Observer, she was editor of Voices, the journal of Rural Southern Voice for Peace based in Celo, NC. A Shelby, NC, native, she lives in Asheville with her husband and two cats. She received her MFA from Queens University of Charlotte. 
     Visit her 
    website to learn more.

    Peggy Poe Stern
     grew up on small farm in the Appalachians near Jefferson, NC; married young; finished school; made handcrafted folk toys; established her own farm on Grandfather Mountain near Boone; raised six children in a single-wide while growing burley tobacco, Christmas trees, and small fruits; built a house; raised small animals – all – while helping her husband do land surveying. Now, still farming, she enjoys her grand and great-grandchildren while creating novels sprinkled with the flavor of her mountain heritage. Her thirteenth novel, Running Wild (about a girl who lives in a cave and is sequel to Wild Thing) should be available at the Festival.
    Richard Allen Taylor co-editor of  Kakalak  Anthology of Carolina Poets, is the author of Something to Read on the Plane (Main Street Rag 2004).  His poems have appeared in Rattle, Iodine Poetry Journal,  Ibbetson Street, South Carolina Review, ken*again, The Powhatan Review, and The Main Street Rag, among others.   
     

    Rob Amberg
     ’s photographs and writing from the rural south have been published and exhibited internationally. He has received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Center for Documentary Studies, Alternate Roots, and the National Endowment for the Arts. His books include: Sodom Laurel Album2002, which received the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award from the Western North Carolina Historical Association; Quartet: Four North Carolina Photographers2007; The Living Tradition: North Carolina Potters Speak2009; and The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress2009. Amberg lives in Madison County, North Carolina, with his wife, Leslie Stilwell, their daughter Kate, and an assortment of animals.

    Noted Cherokee scholar Robert J. Conley, a prolific author with 80 books to his credit during a career spanning 40 years, is the new Sequoyah Distinguished Professor in Cherokee Studies at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, N.C. An Oklahoma Cherokee, Conley has held teaching and administrative positions at numerous institutions during his career, including Northern Illinois University, Southwest Missouri State University, Eastern Montana College, Bacone College, Morningside College, University of New Mexico and Lenoir-Rhyne College. Conley has won numerous awards for his writing, including the Wordcraft Circle “Wordcrafter of the Year” in 1997, and “Writer of the Year” in 1999 for fiction for his War Women.

    Contemporary fiction writer, Rose Senehi, is noted for weaving environmental themes into her romantic thrillers. Her novel, In the Shadows of Chimney Rock is nominated for the 2009 SIBA Book Award by members of the Southern Independent Bookseller’s Alliance as the Best in Southern Literature for the year. Now a resident of Chimney Rock, NC, she moved to Murrells Inlet, SC, from Upstate New York in 1996. Her first novel, Shadows in the Grass was published in 2001, her second, Windfall, in 2002, and her third, Pelican Watch in 2006. She is currently writing her fifth novel, Listen to the Wind, that will come out in 2010. Visit her website.

    Seabrook Wilkinson
     was based in Charleston when he resumed writing poetry in 2004. In September 2007, after visiting for a decade, he became a full-time resident of Key West, which has proved an ideal nursery for verse.  He more than doubled opus numbers in less than two years.  Now, as Amendment of Life creeps towards publication, he is working to cull two more collections from these Key West poems.  He finds some landscapes are better for inhabiting, others for remembering; the Carolina Mountains are excellent for both.  His first collection of poetry is entitled A Local Habitation.
    Susan Woodring 
    award-winning short story writer and novelist, grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina. She also lived in California, Alabama, Illinois, and Indiana as a child. Upon graduating from Western Carolina University, she spent a year teaching in Vologda, Russia before moving to the foothills of North Carolina to teach middle school. Susan is a graduate of the Creative Writing MFA program at Queens University in Charlotte. She is the author of the novel, The Traveling Disease and a short story collection, Springtime on Mars (Press 53). Susan currently lives, writes, and home-schools her two children in Drexel, North Carolina. (Her website)

    Suzanne Adair
     
    is the nom de plume for Suzanne Williams, a native Floridian who currently lives with her family in North Carolina. She is a member of Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, the Historical Novel Society, and the North Carolina Writers Network. Paper Woman, the first book of her historical mystery/suspense series, received the 2007 Patrick D. Smith Literature Award from the Florida Historical Society. The Blacksmith's Daughter and Camp Follower continue her fictional ventures into the Southern theater of the Revolutionary War. Camp Follower is a 2009 nominee for the Daphne du Maurier Award and the Sir Walter Raleigh Award. Visit her website and author blog  for more info and an event calendar.
    Tamara Baxter
    's collection of fiction, Rock Big and Sing Loud won the Morehead State and Jesse Stuart Foundation's First Author's Award for Fiction. Her short fiction, poetry, and essays have been widely published in journals such as Now & ThenArtemisAppalachian HeritageWellspring, and in anthologies such as the 2000 O. Henry Awards Anthology, and The Night Shade Nightstand Reader, edited by Fred Chappell. Baxter has received many awards, including the Harriette Arnow Award, the Sherwood Anderson Award, a Leslie Garrett Award in fiction, and theNational Rose Post Award for creative non-fiction for her essay, "Some Living Room." She is an Associate Professor of English at Northeast State Community College where she teaches literature and creative writing, and is an editor for the literary magazine, Echoes & Images

    Tim Silver 
    is professor of history at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. His book Mount Mitchell & the Black Mountains: An Environmental History of the Highest Peaks in Eastern America (2003) earned him the Phillip D. Reed Memorial Award for Outstanding Writing on the Southern Environment, given by the Southern Environmental Law Center in the book category (2004) and and the Ragan Old North State Award of the North Carlonina Literary and Historical Association for the year's best work of non-fiction (2003) among other awards.  His previous publications include A New Face on the Countryside: Indians, Colonists, and Slaves in South Atlantic Forests, 1500-1800.

    Vicki Lane
     is the author of the critically acclaimed Elizabeth Goodweather Appalachian Mysteries from Bantam Dell -- Signs in the BloodArt's Blood, Old Wounds,  and  In A Dark Season (Romantic Times nominee for Best Contemporary Suspense 2008 and a 2009 nominee for a Best Paperback Original Anthony), as well as The Day of Small Things, a standalone coming in early 2010.  Vicki draws her inspiration from the past and present of rural North Carolina where she and her family have tended a mountainside farm since 1975. Visit her 
    website & blog.
    Wayne Winkler
     is the Director of WETS-FM, East Tennessee State University’s public radio station. A native of Detroit, Winkler received his B.A. in Communications from ETSU in 1988 and received his M.A. in History in 1993. He is president of the Melungeon Historical Society, and the author of Walking Toward the SunsetThe Melungeons of Appalachia (2003, Mercer University Press). Winkler lives in Jonesborough, Tennessee with his wife Andrea and their children Claire and Josef.
    Will Leverette has been paddling his entire life.  His parents and grandparents were pioneers in whitewater paddling in Western North Carolina. His mother was one of the first people of the modern era to canoe the Nantahala—now a premier paddling and rafting destination—and one of the most famous rapids on the French Broad is named after his grandfather, Frank Bell.  He has taught paddling through such institutions as Warren Wilson College, Nantahala Outdoor Center, Outward Bound, and several camps. His book, A History of Whitewater Paddling in Western North Carolina, was put out by The History Press. 
     

    2008
     
     Suzanne Adair
    Suzanne Adair  (historical novelist focusing women’s roles)
        Adair is the nom de plume for Suzanne Williams, a native Floridian who currently lives with her family in North Carolina. She grew up intrigued by stories of suspense and high adventure, Spanish St. Augustine, and the South's role in the Revolutionary War. After visiting the ruins of colonial-era Ft. Frederica on St. Simon's Island, Georgia, she began writing Paper Woman, the first book of her series and the recipient of the 2007 Patrick D. Smith Literature Award from the Florida Historical Society. She enjoys participating in living history to commemorate events from the Southern Theater of the Revolutionary War -- a hobby that helps her depict colonial life in writing. 

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    Sarah Addison Allen (novelist)
         Allen was born and raised in Asheville, North Carolina, and continues to live there.  Garden Spells, her first novel, debuted at #7 on the New York Times Bestsellers List and made the USA Today, Publisher's Weekly, Wall Street Journal and Book Sense bestseller lists.  Her second novel  The Sugar Queen is due out in May 2008 from Bantam.  Garden Spells won the SIBA award for 2007.
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    Sarah Addison Allen

    John Alger


     photo credit Chris John
    Marlin Barton  (novelist)
          Barton's short stories have appeared in Shenandoah, The Virginia Quarterly Review, The Sewanee Review and The American Literary Review. "Jeremiah's Road," a story from his first collection The Dry Well was included in Prize Stories 1994: The O. Henry Awards. Barton was awarded an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Alabama State Council on the Arts in 2006, and received the Andrew Lytle Prize in 1995. Barton's debut novel A Broken Thing was published in 2003. A short story collection, Dancing by the River came out in 2005. Barton lives in Montgomery with his wife Rhonda. He is assistant director of the "Writing Our Stories" project, a program for juvenile offenders.
    More Information


    Tamara Baxter   (poet, editor, novelist)     Register   Workshop Description
        Baxter's collection of fiction, Rock Big and Sing Loud won the Morehead State and Jesse Stuart Foundation's First Author's Award for Fiction. Her short fiction, poetry, and essays have been widely published in journals such as Now & Then, Artemis, Appalachian Heritage, Wellspring, and in anthologies such as the 2000 O. Henry Awards Anthology, and The Night Shade Nightstand Reader, edited by Fred Chappell. Baxter has received many awards, including the Harriette Arnow Award, the Sherwood Anderson Award, a Leslie Garrett Award in fiction, and theNational Rose Post Award for creative non-fiction for her essay, "Some Living Room." She is an Associate Professor of English at Northeast State Community College where she teaches literature and creative writing, and is an editor for the literary magazine, Echoes & Images.


    Tamara Baxter


     Danny Bernstein
    Danny Bernstein  (hiker, writer)
         Bernstein started the website, Hiker to Hiker, after being active in outdoor groups for many years. She is an avid hiker, an active member of the Carolina Mountain Club (CMC) and a life member of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy. She has hiked the whole Appalachian Trail and completed the South Beyond 6000, all the 6,000 foot mountains in the Southern Appalachians.  I have hiked internationally, including Europe, Australia and New Zealand. I was a college professor for many years before I switched careers. Now when I'm not hiking, I write about the outdoors. My book, Hiking the Carolina Mountains was published in April 2007.
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    Dwayne Biddix
            Biddix is the co-founder, co-creator, and penciler of Hard Way Studios, a comic book studio. Some of his credits include; penciling and co-creation of comic titles Morbid Myths, a title selected by Wizard Magazine as number 39 of the top 40 independent books of 2007, House at the Edge of Nowhere, The Supremacy, and Captor of Torments, as well as co-creator of all other titles from the studio. He is also responsible for various other jobs ranging from writing to editing to coloring.



    Jeff Biggers (radio correspondent, writer, educator)
         Biggers has worked as a writer,educator, radio correspondent, and community organizer across the United States, Europe, India and Mexico. His award-winning stories have appeared on NPR, PRI, and in scores of travel, literary and music magazines, and national and foreign newspapers. He has been a commentator on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and for Pacific News Service national syndication. He is the author of In The Sierra Madre and The United States of Appalachia.  His work has been the recipient of an American Book Award.
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    Jeff Biggers

      Sallie Bissell
    Sallie Bissell
      Bissell, a Nashville native, is the author of four novels of suspense featuring the half-Cherokee prosecutor, Mary Crow. The first two novels, In The Forest of Harm and A Darker Justice received critical acclaim from Kirkus Review  and Publisher's Weekly, among others. People Magazine called In The Forest of Harm a “top-notch thriller” while the Los Angeles Times dubbed A Darker Justice one of the Ten Best Mysteries of 2002. Her third and forth novels are Call The Devil By His Oldest Name (2004) and Legacy of Masks (2005). Sallie currently lives near Asheville, North Carolina.
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    John Buchanan (historian)
        Buchanan is an historian who was an archivist at Cornell University and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  During his nearly three decades on the staff of the museum he was, for twenty-two years, chief registrar in charge of worldwide art movements.  He is the author of the highly regarded histories The Road to Guilford Courthouse, The Road to Valley Forge and Jackson’s Way.  He is at work on The Road to Charles Town, a forthcoming account of the final phases of the Revolutionary War in the South.  He lives with his wife in New York City.
     Ged Carbone
    Gerald Carbone (historian, biographer)
         Carbone is the author of the forthcoming book Nathanael Greene: A Biography of the American Revolution.  Carbone has been recognized as an expert on the life of Nathanael Greene by various historical societies. He has won two of American journalism's most prestigious prizes--the American Society of Newspaper Editors Distinguished Writing Award and a John S. Knight Fellowship at Stanford University. He lives in Warwick, RI.


    Gary Carden (playwright, storyteller)
          Carden’s  latest success, a one-man-show entitled The Prince of Dark Corners (performed by Milton Higgins of Burnsville) has been filmed by Heritage Films (filmmaker, Neal Hutcheson) and is scheduled for broadcast by PBS.  Carden’s other dramatic works include The Raindrop Waltz and a series of dramatic monologues, including Nance Dude, Birdell and CoyMason Jars in the Flood received the Appalachian Writers Association Award for Book of the Year (200l) and his video, “Blow the Tannery Whistle” filmed by Tom Davenport has become a storytelling classic.  He is a 2006 recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the NC Folklore Society.
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    Judy  Carson

    Fred Chappell (poet, novelist) Keynote Speaker at Saturday Banquet Register
         Born near Candler, Chappel has produced almost thirty volumes of literature. Perhaps his most ambitious accomplishment has been four poetry collections paired with four novels, each based on one of the four elements -- earth, air, fire, and water -- and all reflecting Chappell's Appalachian roots as he examines the core of human experience: love, community, and mortality. In 1997, following the tenure of Sam Ragan, Chappell's remarkable versatility and skill earned him the title of North Carolina Poet Laureate.
        As professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Chappell has mentored several of our state's fine poets, including Sarah Lindsay, Pulitzer-prize winner Claudia Emerson, and Kathryn Stripling Byer. His excellence in teaching was recognized by the statewide O. Max Gardner Award. Other honors include the Bollingen Prize, the T.S. Eliot Award, and the North Carolina Award for Literature. Now retired from teaching, he lives in Greensboro with his wife Susan, and continues to compose poetry, which he calls "the noblest secular endeavor that the human mind undertakes."



    Fred Chappell


    Jim Clark
    Jim Clark (poet, musician, playwright, professor, editor)
          He has published
    Notions: A Jim Clark Miscellany,
    two books of poems Dancing on Canaan's Ruins, and Handiwork, and has edited Fable in the Blood: The Selected Poems of Byron Herbert Reece.  His first full-lenght play The Girl with the Faraway Eye, was given a public staged reading at The Portland Actors Conservatory Theatre, Portland, OR. He also has several CDs of poems and Appalachian folk music: Buried Land, The Near Myths, and Words to Burn. His stories and poems have appeared in numerous anthologies and in journals and magazines such as The Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, Southern Poetry Review, Asheville Poetry Review, Appalachian Heritage, Now and Then, and Rolling Stone. He lives in Wilson, North Carolina, where he is Professor of Southern Literature, Writer-in-Residence at Barton College, and an editor of Crucible. His readings often include music and songs performed on the guitar, banjo, autoharp, and mountain dulcimer. More Information


    Dr. Dennis Conrad (historian)
           Conrad works as a historian at the early history branch of the Naval Historical Center in Washington, DC. There he helps edit the Naval Documents of the American Revolution series. He has served as editor and project director of the monumental Papers of General Nathanael Greene. He directed the completion of volumes 7 through 12 of that series covering Greene’s campaigns in the South. He also served as contributing editor for volume 13. The monumental Greene papers are recognized for having set a new standard for annotated documentary collections.  Gen. Greene was also the subject of Conrad’s doctoral dissertation at Duke University.
    Dennis Conrad

    Carol Conrad  (education specialist with the National Archives)
       Conrad is an Education Specialist with the National Archives.  She was a contributor to the Archivist-in-Training Kit, an educational tool for elementary and middle school classrooms.  This book presents the National Archives in an exciting, kid-friendly way.
     
    More Information about the National Archives



    Abigail DeWitt (novelist, writing instructor, short story writer) Register
           DeWitt has been teaching creative writing for twenty years.  She has led workshops all over the U.S. and in Europe, and has taught at the Duke Writers' Workshop, Harvard University Summer School, Appalachian State University and UNC-Asheville.  A firm believer that everyone has a story to tell, Abigail enjoys working with both beginning and advanced students.  She has taught published authors as well as those who have never written, and has learned immeasurably from both.  The recipient of several awards and fellowships, she is the author of the novel, Lili, as well as many short stories.


    Myrtle Driver
         Driver, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, has translated Charles Frazier’s  Thirteen Moons: Removal (Tsogadu  Nvdo: Tsigegvwovdisgei), the inaugural publication of the Yonaguska Literature Initiative from the Museum of the Cherokee Indian Press.  She has also translated “Thirteen Moons” by Charles Frazier, frequently appearing with Frazier at readings in both English and Cherokee.
    Myrtle Driver
    Dr. Barbara Duncan Barbara Duncan  (historian, educator, writer, storyteller)
        Duncan is the author of Origins of the Milky Way and other living stories of the Cherokee.  She was the editor of Living Stories of the Cherokee (Winner of a 1999 Storytelling World Award and Winner of the 1998 Thomas Wolfe Literary Award, Western North Carolina Historical Association) and coauthor of the Cherokee Heritage Trails Guidebook.  Dr. Barbara R. Duncan is Education Director of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee, North Carolina.


    Pamela Duncan (novelist)
           Duncan was born in Asheville and raised in Black Mountain, Swannanoa, and Shelby, North Carolina, and currently lives in Saxapahaw, NC.  She holds an MA in English/Creative Writing from North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Her first novel, Moon Women, was a Southeastern Booksellers Association (now Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance) Award Finalist, and her second novel, Plant Life, won the 2003 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction. She is the recipient of the 2007 James Still Award for Writing about the Appalachian South, awarded by the Fellowship of Southern Writers. Her third novel, The Big Beautiful, was published in March 2007.
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    photo by John Rosenthal


    Elizabeth Ellison (artist/illustrator)
           Elizabeth Ellison is a watercolorist-papermaker who has a gallery-studio in Bryson City, NC.  Ellison's pen-and-ink drawings and watercolor washes long have graced the work of her husband, writer/naturalist George Ellison, and others. Publishing venues include The Asheville Citizen-Times, Blue Ridge Outdoors, Outdoor Traveler, Friends of Wildlife, High Vistas, and Chinquapin. In September of 2006, The History Press (Charleston, SC) published Blue Ridge Nature Journal: Reflections on the Appalachians in Essays and Art by George and Elizabeth Ellison. The Ellisons are currently editing and illustrating a two-volume collection titled High Vistas: An Anthology of Nature and Descriptive Writing from Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains. Volume I (1540-1900) will be published by the History Press in spring 2008. More Information



    George Ellison (naturalist, columnist)
           Ellison, who resides in Bryson City, NC,  wrote the biographical introductions for the reissues of two Appalachian classics: Horace Kephart’s Our Southern Highlanders  and James Mooney’s History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the  Cherokees. He writes a “Nature Journal” column for the Asheville Citizen-Times  and a regional history “Back Then” column for Smoky Mountain News. A selection of his "Back Then" columns published in 2005 by The History Press in Charleston, SC, as Mountain Passages: Natural and Cultural History of Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky MountainsThe Ellisons are currently editing and illustrating a two-volume collection titled High Vistas: An Anthology of Nature and Descriptive Writing from Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains. Volume I (1540-1900) will be published by the History Press in spring 2008; volume II (1901-2007) in spring 2009.
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    Georgann Eubanks
    Georgann Eubanks  (poet, musician, reviewer, editor)
      Eubanks has published short stories, poems, reviews, and profiles in many magazines and journals including The Washington Monthly, Oxford American, Bellingham Review, Southern Review, Duke Magazine, Boston Globe Sunday Magazine, Appalachian Heritage, and North American Review. She is a North Carolina Arts Council Literary Fellowship winner (1985), recipient of a regional Emmy for songwriting (2001), and has been Director of the Duke University Writers' Workshop since 1989. Eubanks' current writing project is the creation of a series of literary guidebooks commissioned by the NC Arts Council and published by UNC Press. The first of the the guidebooks is Literary Trails of the North Carolina Mountains.  
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    Alan Gratz  (teen novelist)
         In addition to writing plays, magazine articles, and a few episodes of A&E's City Confidential, Gratz has taught catapult-building to middle-schoolers, and written more than 6,000 radio commercials. Gratz is the author of one of the ALA's 2007 Top Ten Best Books for Young Adults, Samurai Shortstop (Dial 2006), and Something Rotten (Dial 2007), a contemporary young adult murder mystery based on "Hamlet." He is currently at work on a sequel, Something Wicked (Dial 2008), and a middle-grade novel about family, baseball, and American history, called The Brooklyn Nine (Dial 2009).  He now lives with his wife Wendi and his daughter Jo in the high country of Western North Carolina.
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    Alan Gratz
    Anthony Grooms  (poet, novelist, educator)
           Grooms is a writer and arts administrator who is well known for his work in organizing arts events and for his support and encouragement of other writers. Grooms graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1978 with a B.A. in theatre and speech. Later he studied at George Mason University, where he developed a professional interest in creative writing, and graduated in 1984 with a master of fine arts in English. Grooms is the author of a collection of poetry, Ice Poems (1988), a collection of stories, Trouble No More (1995), and a novel, Bombingham (2001).  Trouble No More was named The 2006 Book ALL GEORGIA READS  by the Georgia Center for the Book, a project similar to the Western North Carolina Together We Read program.  It  also won the Lillian Smith Award, the South's oldest literary honor.


    Michael Joslin (writer, historian, photographer, professor)
          Joslin grew up in the Southeast, living from Northern Virginia to Key West, Florida, as his father served in the Navy.  He received his Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of South Carolina in 1977.  Dr. Joslin joined the faculty at Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk, NC in 1989. He teaches literature, writing, and photography.  In addition to his teaching, writing, and hours of taking photographs,  Joslin has his farm chores.  Highland Handcrafters: Appalachian Craftspeople (Parkway Publishers 2006)


    sketch by Kevin Burkhalter
    Mark Kneece (graphic novelist)
          Kneece published his first comic story in Alien Worlds in 1987. His credits include a story arc for Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight and a stint as the writer of Tarzan for the syndicated comic strip. He co-authored The Bristol Board Jungle (NBM Publishing) with Bob Pendarvis in 2003. The novel is based on his experience as a sequential art teacher. Kneece also wrote  a graphic novel entitled Trailers which was nominated for a YALSA Award. Most recently Kneece adapted 8 episodes of the Twilight Zone television series to graphic novel format for Walker Books.  Kneece came to Savannah College of Art and Design in 1993 to teach writing in the sequential art department. He has lived in Savannah ever since.


    Catherine Landis  (novelist, journalist)
       Landis was born in Birmingham, Alabama, but grew up in Chattanooga.  She graduated from high school in 1974 and went to Davidson College in North Carolina, graduating receiving her BA in English in 1978.  She worked in the media for several years, first at a newspaper and later at a television station.  During these time periods Landis wrote short stories, one of which won the Leslie Garrett Award from the Writer’s Guild.  In 1995, she started a novel, Some Days There’s Pie, which was published in 2002.  Her second novel, Harvest, was released in late 2004.
    More Information
     
    Catherine Landis
    Vicki Lane
    Vicki Lane (novelist) Register       Workshop Description
            Vicki Lane, author of Signs in the Blood (Dell 2005), Art's Blood (Dell 2006), Old Wounds (Dell 2007, a Book Sense Notable, nominated for 2008 SIBA Book Award for fiction), and In a Dark Season (Dell 2008), lives with her family on a mountain farm in North Carolina. She is at work on a stand-alone which will be published by Bantam Dell in 2009.
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    Dorianne Laux      Register   Workshop Description
       Laux has worked as a sanatorium cook, a gas station manager, and a maid before receiving a B.A. in English from Mills College in 1988. Her fourth book of poems, Facts about the Moon (W. W. Norton & Company) is the recipient of the Oregon Book Award and was shortlisted for the 2006 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize for the most outstanding book of poems published in the United States in the previous year. Laux also has three poetry books from BOA Editions, Awake, What We Carry (1994), finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Smoke, (2000). She is co-author of The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry (1990).  Her work has appeared in the Best of The American Poetry Review and The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, and has been included twice in Best American Poetry.  She has been awarded with a Pushcart Prize, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Laux is a professor at North Carolina State University’s creative writing program.




    Dorianne Laux
      Myra MacPherson (journalist, biographer)
           Her most recent book "All Governments Lie!":The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone was published by Simon & Schuster in 2006. MacPherson is the author of three previous books, including the Vietnam War classic Long Time Passing. She was a highly regarded journalist at the Washington Post for many years, and has also written for the New York Times and numerous magazines, including Vanity Fair. She lives in Palm Desert, California, and Washington, D.C.  She is also a critic of this year's media campaign coverage for Harvard's NiemanWatchdog.org  



    Joanne Mauldin  (editor, biographer)
         Mauldin is an independent scholar and author of Thomas Wolfe When Do the Atrocities Begin?. She began her Wofle Studies in 1982.  She is currently working on Wolfe's unpublished manuscript, "The Return of the Prodigal," about the author's first visit to Yancey County and his final visit to Asheville in 1937.  Her articles have appeared in Southern Exposure, The Thomas Wolfe Review, and Pembroke Magazine. She is the owner of Levelheaded Editing Services.
          (pictured with her is Thomas Woof)

    Joanne Mauldin

    Dale Mettam
         After a varied career that showed very little likelihood of ending up in writing, Dale found himself relocating to North Carolina from England, married, with a mortgage, a baby and no job. Writing was a way to save his sanity. Six years later he's written screenplays, comics, a novel, short-stories... in fact the only thing he hasn't written are the comments in restroom stalls and Romance novels. Considering where he started, some of his work has been quite well received. He is currently working on several projects for Viper Comics and Hard Way Studios and shameless neglecting his website.


    Joe Millar
    Joseph Millar  (poet)          Register   Workshop Description
       Millar's writing includes two books of poetry, Overtime (Eastern Washington University Press 2001) and Fortune (Eastern Washington University Press 2006), as well as two chapbooks, "Slow Dancer" and "Midlife: (Passionate Lives: Eight Autobiographical Poem Cycles)." In 1995, Millar was awarded first place in the Montalvo Biennial Poetry Competition, and won second place in the National Writers Union competition, judged by Philip Levine. He is the recipient of a 2003 NEA Poetry Fellowship.His work has appeared in many magazines and journals, including The Alaska Quarterly Review, Ploughshares, Poetry International, and Prairie Schooner. He now teaches writing at Oregon State University, the University of Oregon, and the MFA in Writing Program at Pacific University. He is married to poet Dorianne Laux.




    Karen Hokanson Miller  (educator, children's novelist)
           Protesting “There’s nothing to read,” Karen Miller’s 6th grade students convinced her to write a book just for them. "Everyone likes monsters," they told her. But there weren’t any books about real monsters. So Miller began a six year study of undiscovered beasts. Her first book, Monsters, Shapeshifters and Water Beasts, will be published by Henry Holt in spring 2007.
            A teacher, literature consultant, bookseller and mother of four, Karen Miller lives in Burnsville, North Carolina with her husband, Bob and dog Lucy. She has four adult children, aged 22-31 years old. 
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    photo by Emilee Rose
     

      photo by Curt Richter
    Robert Morgan (novelist, poet)
           Morgan is the author of the award-winning and bestselling novel Gap Creek, an Oprah Book Club selection in 2000 and winner of the Southern Book Award for fiction.  Morgan has published five books of fiction, including  The Truest Pleasure, and Brave Enemies: A Novel of the American Revolution.. He has published nine volumes of poetry and has published poems in many magazines. Additional awards and honors include four NEA Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Fellowship, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the James G. Hanes Poetry Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers.  His book Boone is the 2008 Together We Read selection.
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    Rob Neufeld  (journalist, editor, writer, advocate of WNC literature)
           Rob Neufeld is the book critic and local history feature writer for the Asheville Citizen-Times.  He is the editor The Making of a Writer: The Journals of Gail Godwin (Random House 2006); and the author of A Popular History of Western North Carolina (History Press 2007).  He is also the director of Together We Read, western North Carolina’s 21-county reading, discussion, and heritage program, now in its sixth year.  He is an experienced lecturer, performer, and discussion moderator.  He has been studying and writing about local history all his adult life.  His book Asheville's River Arts District will be published by Arcadia in July 2008.
     
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    Troy Wayne Poteete Troy Wayne Poteete  (historian)
         Poteet, an enrolled member of the Cherokee nation, is an oral historian.  He received his J. D. degree in May 2001 from the University of Tulsa-College of Law.  He currently serves on the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court.  He was a founding member of the National Trail of Tears Association and served on the National Park Service Trail of Tears Advisory Council as an appointee of the governor of Oklahoma. 


    Charles F. Price (historical novelist)
           Price has published four novels to date:  Hiwassee: A Novel of the Civil War, Freedom's Altar, (1999 Sir Walter Raleigh Award), The Cock's Spur (Independent Publisher's 2001 Book Award as one of the Ten Outstanding Books of the Year and Clark Cox Historical Fiction Award) and Where the Water-Dogs Laughed.
           One of the chief characters in his new Revolutionary War novel Nor the Battle to the Strong is a maternal ancestor who served in the Continental Army.  Nor the Battle to the Strong is being released July 4, 2008 from Frederic C. Beil Publisher of Savannah, GA.  He currently lives in Yancey County.
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    Ron Rash (poet, novelist)
          Rash is the author of six books: The Night The New Jesus Fell to Earth (short stories), Casualties (short stories), Eureka Mill (poetry), and Among the Believers (poetry), Raising the Dead (poetry), One Foot in Eden (novel) and Saints at the River (novel) and The World Made Straight (novel).  Rash is a past winner of an NEA Poetry Fellowship. One Foot in Eden received the Appalachian Book of the Year award and Foreword Magazine's Gold Medal in Literary FictionSaints at the River was the 2006  Together We Read book.  His new novel Serena is due out in October 2008.
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    Rose Senehi
         Senehi is noted for weaving environmental themes into her plots. In the Shadows of Chimney Rock was inspired by her love of the Western North Carolina mountains where she has a home. In her last novel, Pelican Watch, she drew upon her love of the people on the South Carolina Coast who are fighting to preserve the nesting grounds of the Loggerhead turtle. She moved to the South from Upstate New York in 1996. Her first novel, Shadows in the Grass, was published in 2001, her second, Windfall, in 2002, and her third, Pelican Watch, in 2006. Senehi was a featured author at the 2007 Readers in the Rockys Symposium in Crested Butte, Colorado, and the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC, in 2006 and 2007.
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    Rose Senehi
    Timothy Silver (professor, environmental scholar, historian)
           Silver is professor of history at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. His book Mount Mitchell & the Black Mountains: An Environmental History of the Highest Peaks in Eastern America (2003) earned him the Phillip D. Reed Memorial Award for Outstanding Writing on the Southern Environment, given by the Southern Environmental Law Center in the book category (2004) and and the Ragan Old North State Award of the North Carlonina Literary and Historical Association for the year's best work of non-fiction (2003) among other awards.  His previous publications include A New Face on the Countryside: Indians, Colonists, and Slaves in South Atlantic Forests, 1500-1800.
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    Peggy Poe Stern
         Peggy Poe Stern is a native of North Carolina, born and raised in Ashe County and living in Foscoe for the past thirty-four years. Her greatest pleasure lies in writing about her beloved mountains and their inhabitants. She studied creative writing at ASU, UNCA, NCSU, and CCC. Since 2003, she has completed 10 novels including Tamarack, When Robin’s Weep, The Hills of Home, Mountain Splendor, Blood Moon Rising, Above All, and Joppa. She has also written Mountain Talk and To Everything There is a Season. Her eleventh novel, Hillbilly should be released in the fall of 2008. When asked about her prolific writing, she says: “Honey, I’m just getting warmed up.”
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    Peggy Poe Stern



    Neal Thompson
    Neal Thompson (freelance journalist, writer, writing professor)
         Thompson began his award-winning journalism career as a reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer. For the next 15 years, he worked up and down the East Coast - specializing in profiles, narratives and investigations - at such papers as the Roanoke Times & World-News in southwest Virginia, the St. Petersburg Times, and the Bergen Record in northern New Jersey. At the Baltimore Sun he covered the military and began researching his book Light This Candle.  Other published books are Driving with the Devil and Hurrican Season: A Coach, His Team, and Their Triumph in the Time of Katrina (soon to become an HBO film).  As a freelance journalist, he has written for numerous national publications: Outside, Esquire,
    the Washington Post Magazine, and Christian Science Monitor. Thompson teaches creative non-fiction at the University of North Carolina-Asheville's Great Smokies Writing Program.
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    Kevin Watson  (publisher, writer)
           Watson is co-owner and founding editor of Press 53. His short stories have appeared in ART Magazine, Amarillo Bay, The Rose & Thorn Literary E-zine, and others. His short story "Sunny Side Up" won the 2002 OutRider Press/TallGrass Writers' Guild short fiction contest and appeared in the 2002 anthology TAKE TWO—THEY'RE SMALL. Prior to moving to Winston-Salem, NC, in 1997, Kevin spent ten years in Nashville, TN, as a songwriter, writing primarily for Crosswinds Music and Maypop Music, the publishing house for the band Alabama. He has shared the stage with Garth Brooks, Bill Monroe, Holly Dunn, Mary Chapin Carpenter and others. 

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    Barbara Webster
    Barbara Webster  (quilter, editor)
       Since moving to Burnsville, Webster has had a book published about quiltmaking, and now is Executive Director of Quilt Trails of Western North Carolina. This project is a heritage project, focused on capturing the history of both Yancey and Mitchell counties. Each quilt block that goes up has a story behind it. She has been coordinating efforts by various local writers to capture these stories, and is editor and publisher of a newsletter every other month about the project. A book of the stories is in the works, and interim publications are coming out to meet the growing curiosity of the local community and the touring public.

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    Seabrook Wilkinson (poet, historian, educator, literary critic)
           Wilkinson’s connections with Charleston and the Carolina Lowcountry go back to 1670.  Most of his education was far afield, at Harvard (A.B., History of Art) and then Oxford (B.A., M.A., Theology).  He remained in Britain to work in another ancestral city, Edinburgh, as Head of English at Fettes College.  As Charlestonians tend to do, he came home to roost, and while teaching at local colleges began to ascend the Ph.D. salmon-leap, whose top rung he is now approaching.  His published criticism ranges from Marlowe to Frost.  After decades of scrutinizing the poems of others, he began to write his own again; A Local Habitation was released in 2008. 


    Susan Woodring
    Susan Woodring  (short story writer, novelist)
         Woodring grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina, among other midwest states. Upon graduating from Western Carolina University, she spent a year teaching in Vologda, Russia before moving to the foothills of North Carolina to teach middle school. Susan is a graduate of the MFA program at Queens University in Charlotte. She is the author of one novel, The Traveling Disease. Her short fiction has earned many honors, including the 2006 Elizabeth Simpson Smith Short Fiction Award and the 2006 Isotope Editor’s Prize. Her work has appeared in Quick Fiction, Yemassee, Ballyhoo Stories,  The William and Mary Review, Isotope: A Journal of Literary Nature and Science Writing, Passages North, and Surreal South (Press 53). Susan currently lives, writes, and home-schools her two children in Drexel, North Carolina.  More Information




    *  The ideas and opinions expressed by authors at the Carolina Mountains Literary Festival or on their web sites linked to from our web page are not necessarily those of or endorsed by the Carolina Mountains Literary Festival.

    2007

    Dr. Lloyd Bailey  (historian, professor)
           Born in Yancey in 1936, Dr. Bailey taught for 28 years in the divinity school of Duke University, and is (in retirement) professor of religion at Mount Olive College and Methodist College.  He has published five large volumes of the series Heritage of Toe River Valley and has four more in preparation.  As an authority on the history and genealogy of the Toe River Valley (the counties of Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey in Western North Carolina) he has published several other volumes: History of the Methodist Church in the Toe River Valley, History of the Bailey family of Yancey County and News from Yancey among others.
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    Charles Baxley (historian)
          Baxley earned a B.A. and J.D. from the University of South Carolina. He is a practicing attorney in Lugoff, SC, and is the publisher and editor of the magazine, Southern Campaigns of the American Revolution. He has served as president of the Kershaw County Historical Society, a USAF reserve officer, a Municipal Judge, adjunct professor of law, and as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Kershaw County public school system. He has served as a planner, host, and tour guide at symposia on Banastre Tarleton, the Camden Campaign, Thomas Sumter, and the Nathanael Greene; for US Army staff rides; and for other tours of Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War sites. 

    Bill Brooks (novelist, closet poet)
           Before turning pro in 1992 with his first novel, Brooks spent 16 years in the Health Care profession in the midwest.  Prior to that he had the typical writer's background, having worked a plethora of jobs including shoe salesman, shipyard laborer, factory worker, and gas station attendant and journalist.
           While Brooks publishes mostly western novels, he is most proud of his non-western novels, The Stone Garden, Pretty Boy, and Bonnie & Clyde: A Love Story. In the last several years he has begun to teach creative writing in various venues, including, last year a week at the famed Chautauqua Institute.
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    John Buchanan (historian)
        Buchanan is an historian who was an archivist at Cornell University and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  During his nearly three decades on the staff of the museum he was, for twenty-two years, chief registrar in charge of worldwide art movements.  He is the author of the highly regarded histories The Road to Guilford Courthouse, The Road to Valley Forge and Jackson’s Way.  He is at work on The Road to Charles Town, a forthcoming account of the final phases of the Revolutionary War in the South.  He lives with his wife in New York City.

    photo by Chris English Kathryn Stripling Byer (poet, essayist)
      Coming To Rest, Byer's fifth book of poetry, is due out in April 2006.  Also published are Catching Light (2002); Black Shawl (1998); Wildwood Flower (1992), which was the 1992 Lamont Poetry Selection of The Academy of American Poets; and The Girl in the Midst of the Harvest (1986), which was published in the Associated Writing Programs award series.  Among her other accolades are the Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Prize, the Brockman-Campbell Award, and appointment as Poet Laureate of North Carolina. She lives in Cullowhee, located in the western mountains of the state.
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    Wayne Caldwell (novelist)
          Caldwell was born in Asheville, North Carolina, and was educated at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Appalachian State University, and Duke University. He began writing fiction in the late 1990s. He has published four short stories and a poem, and won two short story prizes. Caldwell lives near Asheville with his wife, Mary. Cataloochee is his first novel. 



    Gary Carden (playwright, storyteller)
          Carden’s  latest success, a one-man-show entitled The Prince of Dark Corners (performed by Milton Higgins of Burnsville) has been filmed by Heritage Films (filmmaker, Neal Hutcheson) and is scheduled for broadcast by PBS.  Carden’s other dramatic works include The Raindrop Waltz and a series of dramatic monologues, including Nance Dude, Birdell and CoyMason Jars in the Flood received the Appalachian Writers Association Award for Book of the Year (200l) and his video, “Blow the Tannery Whistle” filmed by Tom Davenport has become a storytelling classic.  He is a 2006 recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the NC Folklore Society.
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    Congrats to Gary who can't be with us because of his upcoming chochlear implant surgery!

    Bill Carson


    Jo Carson (playwright)
         Carson is an award-winning playwright who has written 20 performance projects with communities all over America, based on their own life stories, includingSwamp Gravy in Colquitt, Ga., and Cross Tides in Newport News, Va. She's also written short stories, books for children, essays and poems, and been a regular commentator on NPR's "All Things Considered." Carson, who hails from East Tennessee, has won numerous prestigious writing awards, including the Kesserling Award in 1989 for Daytrips, her hilarious and compassionate play about a family dealing with Alzheimer's Disease. She is a quintessential community artist, with a true ear for the way people talk and what they really mean to say.



    Judy  Carson
    Richard Chess (poet, professor)
          Chess has published two books of poetry, Tekiah and Chair in the Desert. His poems have appeared in several anthologies, including Telling and Remembering:  a Century of American-Jewish Poetry, as well as many journals. His third collection, Third Temple, will be published by the University of Tampa Press in February 2007. He directs the Center for Jewish Studies at UNCA and UNCA's Creative Writing Program. He has also taught in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College, and he has been writer-in-residence at the Brandeis Bardin Institute.  He lives with his wife, son, and two step daughters in Asheville.



    Dr. Dennis Conrad (historian)
           Conrad works as a historian at the early history branch of the Naval Historical Center in Washington, DC. There he helps edit the Naval Documents of the American Revolution series. He has served as editor and project director of the monumental Papers of General Nathanael Greene. He directed the completion of volumes 7 through 12 of that series covering Greene’s campaigns in the South. He also served as contributing editor for volume 13. The monumental Greene papers are recognized for having set a new standard for annotated documentary collections.  Gen. Greene was also the subject of Conrad’s doctoral dissertation at Duke University.


    photograph by Tim Barnwell Marshall De Bruhl
         De Bruhl was for many years an executive and editor with several major American publishing houses, most notably as Senior Vice President of the Scribner Book Companies and Executive Editor and Director of  Anchor Press at Doubleday.   He is the author of Sword of San Jacinto: A Life of Sam Houston (Random House, 1993); Firestorm: Allied Air Power and the Destruction of Dresden (Random House, 2006); and co-compiler of The International Thesaurus of Quotations (HarperCollins, 1996). He has also served as editor of, and contributor to, the Dictionary of American History and the Dictionary of American Biography. He was born and now lives in Asheville, North Carolina.
    We regret that a scheduling difficulty has arisen and Mr. DeBruhl cannot come this year.



    Abigail DeWitt (novelist, writing instructor, short story writer)
           DeWitt has been teaching creative writing for twenty years.  She has led workshops all over the U.S. and in Europe, and has taught at the Duke Writers' Workshop, Harvard University Summer School, Appalachian State University and UNC-Asheville.  A firm believer that everyone has a story to tell, Abigail enjoys working with both beginning and advanced students.  She has taught published authors as well as those who have never written, and has learned immeasurably from both.  The recipient of several awards and fellowships, she is the author of the novel, Lili, as well as many short stories.


    M. Scott Douglass
          M. Scott Douglass is the publisher and editor of Main Street Rag. He recently released his third book, Steel Womb Revisited. A chapbook, Dip Says Hi, is due out in May from Rank Stranger Press. 
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    John Ehle (novelist)
           Ehle was raised in Asheville and sets many of his books in North Carolina.  He has written 11 works of fiction including Move Over, Mountain, Winter People, The Journey of August King, Widow's Trial and The Road (which recounts building the railroad across the  Appalachian mountains).  His most recent book of non-fiction is Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation.  Ehle has received the North Carolina Award for Literature, the Thomas Wolfe Prize and the Lillian Smith Award for Southern Fiction, and he is a five-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction.
    Two of his books are being re-issued by Press53 in 2007.

    Elizabeth Ellison (artist/illustrator)
           Elizabeth Ellison is a watercolorist-papermaker who has a gallery-studio in Bryson City, NC.  Ellison's pen-and-ink drawings and watercolor washes long have graced the work of her husband, writer/naturalist George Ellison, and others. Publishing venues include The Asheville Citizen-Times, Blue Ridge Outdoors, Outdoor Traveler, Friends of Wildlife, High Vistas, and Chinquapin.
      In September of 2006, The History Press (Charleston, SC) published Blue Ridge Nature Journal: Reflections on the Appalachians in Essays and Art by George and Elizabeth Ellison.
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    George Ellison (naturalist, columnist)
           Ellison, who resides in Bryson City, NC,  wrote the biographical introductions for the reissues of two Appalachian classics: Horace Kephart’s Our Southern Highlanders  and James Mooney’s History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the  Cherokees. He writes a “Nature Journal” column for the Asheville Citizen-Times  and a regional history “Back Then” column for Smoky Mountain News. A selection of his "Back Then" columns published in 2005 by The History Press in Charleston, SC, as Mountain Passages: Natural and Cultural History of Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains  has gone into a third printing. More Information

    Francie Hall  (storyteller, educator, children's author)
           Hall is the author of Appalchain ABC's  and Scottish Highland GamesShe has served four years as a radio control operator for jungle aircraft serving humanitarian needs in Suriname, South America; for nine years as a televisio writer/producer of a weekly educational program for the Kenyan government in Nairobi, Kenya, East Africa; and for sixteen years as a teacher/administrator in Watauga County Schools.  She is currently supervising student teachers for Appalchian State Universtiy and continuing to write.  She has appeared on the Today Show and has spoken to a variety of curches, organizations, and schools.  Francie is married, has three children and eight grandchildren.



    Elizabeth Baird Hardy  (storyteller, educator) 
         Originally from Berea, Kentucky, Hardy comes from a family of storytellers. She began telling stories in public at the age of fifteen, and has hardly stopped since then. Her tales include her "Tales from Two Creeks," named after Indian Creek, where her mother's people lived, and "Jellico Creek," where her father grew up. She also relates the adventures of the hapless circuit-riding Preacher Templeton. Her first book, Milton, Spenser and the Chronicles of Narnia: Literary Sources for the C.S. Lewis Novels, was published in 2007. Hardy is an English Instructor at Mayland Community College and lives in Avery County with her husband and son, her two favorite characters.

    Michael Hardy (historian, photographer)
           Hardy is an award winning author and historian whose work focuses mostly on western North Carolina, a place where portions of his family first settled in the mid-1700s. Michael’s work includes histories of Confederate regiments and Civil War battles, and scholarly or pictorial histories of Watauga, Yancey, Caldwell, and Avery Counties. His most recent work is Remembering Avery County: Old Tales from North Carolina’s Youngest County (The History Press, 2007). Michael was nominated for North Carolina Historian of the Year in 2006. He lives with his wife Elizabeth, son Nathaniel, and daughter Isabella, near Grandfather Mountain. 
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    Irene Honeycutt (poet) 
           Irene Blair Honeycutt, award-winning poet and teacher, founded CPCC’s annual literary festival and directed it for 14 years.  Upon her recent retirement, the college established in her honor the Irene Blair Honeycutt Distinguished Lectureship.  She leads writing retreats/workshops around the region.  She has published two poetry books—It Comes As a Dark Surprise (Sandstone Publishing 1992); Waiting for the Trout to Speak (Novello Festival Press 2002)—and one children’s book, The Prince with the Golden Hair (D-NP 2006). 
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    Gloria Houston (educator, children's author)
         Currently living again in her native western North Carolina, Dr. Houston works as a  writing consultant from her home and speaks as an author and writing consultant when her health permits. Houston's historical fiction has won more than 40 national and one international awards. Her innovative writing methods text and teacher handbook, How Writing Works:  Imposing Organizational Structure within the Writing Process, was released in 1994 by Allyn & Bacon/Longman.  She is working on a language arts text and handbook, Teaching the Language Arts through the Arts, also for Allyn & Bacon/Longman. 
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    Anthony Grooms  (poet, novelist, educator)
           Grooms is a writer and arts administrator who is well known for his work in organizing arts events and for his support and encouragement of other writers. Grooms graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1978 with a B.A. in theatre and speech. Later he studied at George Mason University, where he developed a professional interest in creative writing, and graduated in 1984 with a master of fine arts in English.
    Grooms is the author of a collection of poetry, Ice Poems (1988), a collection of stories, Trouble No More (1995), and a novel, Bombingham (2001). 
    Due to a conflit in schedules, Tony will not be able to attend in 2007--but 2008 perhaps.

    Dot Jackson  (reporter, novelist)
           Jackson turned an abiding curiosity into a lifelong career in newspapers, going from murder trials to snake-handling prayer meetings to some of the hardest-fought environmental battles of our times. As an investigative reporter for the Charlotte Observer, she wrote about, and often brought to justice, the industrial polluters whose stories garnered Jackson several Pulitzer Prize nominations and a National Conservation Writer of the Year award. She also has collaborated on several acclaimed books of non-fiction.  Refuge is Dot Jackson’s first book-length work of fiction. 



    Hunter James  (investigative reporter, editorialist, novelist)
           James has spent more than thirty five years as an editorialist and correspondent for such papers as the Atlanta Constitution and Baltimore Sun, winning numerous press association awards for his work, as well as a share of the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. His articles and stories have appeared in Newsweek, National Geographic (book division), Historic Preservation, Southern Magazine, The Southern Review.  He has published eight books (including All the Forgotten Places and Last Days of the Big Grassy Fork) and a novel. 
    Alas, Hunter James will not be able to attend the 2007 festival for health reasons.
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    Steve Kirk (editor, non-fictionalist)
      Kirk has been the editor at John F. Blair, Publisher, since 1988. He is the author of Scribblers: Stalking the Authors of the Appalachia, an IPPY Award finalist, and First In Flight:  The Wright Brothers in North Carolina, one of the sources used in the national PBS documentary commemorating the first-flight centennial. The second story he ever wrote was selected for reprinting in the Best American Short Stories series. He lives near Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 
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    Vicki Lane (novelist)
            Vicki Lane, author of Signs in the Blood (Dell 2005), Arts Blood (Dell 2006), and Old Wounds (coming in 2007) lives with her husband, sons, and daughter-in-law on a mountain farm in North Carolina. She is at work on the fourth Elizabeth Goodweather novel, which will be published by Bantam-Dell in 2008.
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    photo by Max Poppers
    Myra MacPherson (journalist, biographer)
           Her most recent book "All Governments Lie!":The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone was published by Simon & Schuster in 2006.  (It was recently announced as a finalist in the PEN USA Literary Awards, a top ten biography for 2006-2007 Book List and a Best Book of 2006 by The Boston Globe and The Rocky Mountain News.)  MacPherson is the author of three previous books, including the Vietnam War classic Long Time Passing. She was a highly regarded journalist at the Washington Post for many years, and has also written for the New York Times and numerous magazines, including Vanity Fair. She lives in Palm Desert, California, and Washington, D.C.
    Myra MacPherson is experiencing house woes and must supervise sustantial repairs due to water damage.  She regrets she has to miss the festival.



    Dr. Greg Massey (professor, historian)
           Massey earned a Ph.D. in History from the University of South Carolina in 1992. He is the author of John Laurens and the American Revolution (2000) for which received the American Revolution Round Table of New York’s Book Award in 2001. Dr. Massey is Professor of History a Freed-Hardeman University, Henderson, Tennessee.


    photo by Emilee Rose Karen Hokanson Miller  (educator, children's novelist)
           Protesting “There’s nothing to read,” Karen Miller’s 6th grade students convinced her to write a book just for them. "Everyone likes monsters," they told her. But there weren’t any books about real monsters. So Miller began a six year study of undiscovered beasts. Her first book, Monsters, Shapeshifters and Water Beasts, will be published by Henry Holt in spring 2007.
            A teacher, literature consultant, bookseller and mother of four, Karen Miller lives in Burnsville, North Carolina with her husband, Bob and dog Lucy. She has four adult children, aged 22-31 years old. 
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    Sheryl Monks (short fiction writer, editor)
           Monks holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Queens University of Charlotte and a BA in English from Salem College. In 2005, she was awarded a Northwest North Carolina Regional Artist Project Grant a.  Her stories have appeared in RE:AL, Backwards City Review, and Southern Gothic online. As an intern at John F. Blair, Publisher in Winston-Salem, she helped edit and write Travel North Carolina: Going Native in the Old North State, 2nd ed. and later wrote a book of folklore for Blair, Ghostly Lighthouses from Maine to Florida. Monks is a co-owner of Press 53  and teaches creative writing at Salem College and Intro. to Literature at Surry Community College.
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    photo by Curt Richter Robert Morgan (novelist, poet)
           Morgan is the author of the award-winning and bestselling novel Gap Creek, an Oprah Book Club selection in 2000 and winner of the Southern Book Award for fiction. His earlier novel The Truest Pleasure was a finalist for the same award and was a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year and a New York Times Notable. Morgan has published five books of fiction, including Brave Enemies: A Novel of the American Revolution.. He has published nine volumes of poetry and has published poems in many magazines. Additional awards and honors include four NEA Fellowships, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Fellowship, the North Carolina Award for Literature, the James G. Hanes Poetry Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers.
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    Rob Neufeld
           Rob Neufeld is the book critic and local history feature writer for the Asheville Citizen-Times.  He is the editor The Making of a Writer: The Journals of Gail Godwin (Random House 2006); and the author of A Popular History of Western North Carolina (History Press 2007).  He is also the director of Together We Read, western North Carolina’s 21-county reading, discussion, and heritage program, now in its sixth year.  He is an experienced lecturer, performer, and discussion moderator.  He has been studying and writing about local history all his adult life.
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    Michael Parker  (novelist)
           Parker is the author of five works of fiction including the novels Hello Down There and If You Want Me To Stay.  His stories have appeared in the Oxford American, Five Points, Shenandoah and many other magazines and in the Pushcart, New Stories from the South and O. Henry Award anthologies.  A new collection of stories, Don’t Make Me Stop Now, is forthcoming from Algonquin Books in 2007.  For his work he has received fellowships in fiction from the North Carolina Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the 2006 Mary Frances Hobson Award in Arts and Letters.  He teaches in the MFA Writing Program at UNC Greensboro.



    Charles F. Price (historical novelist)
           Price has published four novels to date:  Hiwassee: A Novel of the Civil War, Freedom's Altar, (1999 Sir Walter Raleigh Award), The Cock's Spur (Independent Publisher's 2001 Book Award as one of the Ten Outstanding Books of the Year and Clark Cox Historical Fiction Award) and Where the Water-Dogs Laughed.
           One of the chief characters in his new Revolutionary War novel Nor the Battle to the Strong is a maternal ancestor who served in the Continental Army.  Nor the Battle to the Strong is forthcoming in 2007 from Frederic C. Beil Publisher of Savannah, GA.  He currently lives in Yancey County.
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    Glenis Redmond
           Redmond is an award-winning performance poet, praise poet, educator and writer from Asheville, North Carolina.  For the past thirteen years, she has traveled both domestically and abroad carrying the message of poetry  to the masses.  She has been published in Meridians, Hearthstone, Black Arts Quarterly, Obsidian II, Emrys Journal and Appalachian Herigate Journal among others. She has received numerous awards, including the Cary McCray Literary Award, and has been the two time recipient of both the Vermont Studio Center for the Arts Fellowship and the Atlantic Center for the Arts Fellowship.  In 2005 she won the North Carolina Literary Fellowship.  Her two full length books of poetry are Backbone(2000) and Under the Sun (2005)
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    Pat Riviere-Seel (poet)
           A native of Shelby, NC, Riviere-Seel lived, wrote, and ran in Yancey County from 1992-1997 when she married Ed Seel and moved to Germany. She has lived in Asheville since 1999. Her poetry has been published in a variety of literary journals and anthologies including Asheville Poetry Review, Main Street Rag, Pinesong Anthology of Award Winning Poems, and Crucible, among others. Current work appears in Kakalak 2007: An Anthology of Carolina Poets and Passager. Her first collection of poetry, No Turning Back Now was a finalist in Finishing Line Press’s New Women’s Voices chapbook contest (2004) and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She teaches in the Great Smokies Writing Program at UNCA. 

    photo by Ed Seel
    Dr. Preston Russell (painter, writer, historian)
           A native Tennesseean, he is a graduate of Tulane University and Vanderbilt Medical School.  Retired from medicine, Dr. Russell now paints in his Savannah studio and writes extensively about historical themes. He was chief editor of Why America is Free, a new fifth-to-eighth-grade textbook on the contribution made by the Revolutionary War generation to the founding of the United States.  He co-authored, with Barbara Hines, Savannah: A History of Her People Since 1733 and also wrote The History of the Georgia Society of Colonial Wars; The Low Country: From Savannah to Charleston; and a penetrating study Lights of Madness: In Search of Joan of Arc
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    Timothy Silver (professor, environmental scholar, historian)
           Silver is professor of history at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. His book Mount Mitchell & the Black Mountains: An Environmental History of the Highest Peaks in Eastern America (2003) earned him the Phillip D. Reed Memorial Award for Outstanding Writing on the Southern Environment, given by the Southern Environmental Law Center in the book category (2004) and and the Ragan Old North State Award of the North Carlonina Literary and Historical Association for the year's best work of non-fiction (2003) among other awards.  His previous publications include A New Face on the Countryside: Indians, Colonists, and Slaves in South Atlantic Forests, 1500-1800.
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    Betty Smith (ballad singer, educator)
      Smith has performed, taught and shared the traditional music of the South for over thirty years in classrooms, concert halls, workshops, and festivals. She has been honored by the Appalachian Writers Association for her contributions to Appalachian Literature, by the North Carolina Folklore Society for her contributions to the study and appreciation of folklife with the Brown-Hudson Award, and the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Award for “significant contributions to Appalachian music”.  Her book, Jane Hicks Gentry: A Singer Among Singers, was awarded the Willie Parker Peace History Book Award by the North Carolina Society of Historians.
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    Dr. Christine Swager
           Swager is a retired professor of education, storyteller and author of three award winning youth books on the Southern Campaign: Black Crows and White Cockades, If Ever Your Country Needs You, and Come to the Cow Pens! Her latest book, aimed at general readers, The Valiant Died is the first modern study that covers in detail the Eutaws Campaign of Gen. Nathanael Greene. Born in Canada, she is a descendent of both an American who served with the British Army and settled in Canada after the war, and Continental soldiers who fought in Connecticut and Maine. She is a highly sought speaker, commentator and newspaper columnist.

    Peter Turchi (novelist, non-fictionalist, educator)
           Turchi is the author of a novel, a collection of stories, and two books of nonfiction, including, most recently, Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer. He has also co-edited two anthologies, The Story Behind the Story and Bringing the Devil to His Knees, and an exhibition catalog for the artist Charles Ritchie. The recipient of North Carolina’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award and fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, he has taught in and directed the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College since 1993.
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    Kevin Watson
           Watson is co-owner and founding editor of Press 53. His short stories have appeared in ART Magazine, Amarillo Bay, The Rose & Thorn Literary E-zine, and others. His short story "Sunny Side Up" won the 2002 OutRider Press/TallGrass Writers' Guild short fiction contest and appeared in the 2002 anthology TAKE TWO—THEY'RE SMALL. Prior to moving to Winston-Salem, NC, in 1997, Kevin spent ten years in Nashville, TN, as a songwriter, writing primarily for Crosswinds Music and Maypop Music, the publishing house for the band Alabama. He has shared the stage with Garth Brooks, Bill Monroe, Holly Dunn, Mary Chapin Carpenter and others. 
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    Seabrook Wilkinson (poet, historian, educator, literary critic)
           Wilkinson’s connections with Charleston and the Carolina Lowcountry go back to 1670.  Most of his education was far afield, at Harvard (A.B., History of Art) and then Oxford (B.A., M.A., Theology).  He remained in Britain to work in another ancestral city, Edinburgh, as Head of English at Fettes College.  As Charlestonians tend to do, he came home to roost, and while teaching at local colleges began to ascend the Ph.D. salmon-leap, whose top rung he is now approaching.  His published criticism ranges from Marlowe to Frost.  After decades of scrutinizing the poems of others, he began to write his own again; A Local Habitation is in press. 



    Isabel Zuber (poet, novelist)
           Zuber was born and grew up in Boone, NC. She lives in Winston-Salem, was a librarian at Wake Forest University for many years, and is now writing full time. Some of her prizes include the publication prize in the North Carolina Writers Network poetry chapbook contest, Lee Smith Award for Fiction from the Appalachian Writers Association, University of Tennessee Press prize for short story, Forsyth County Arts Council grant, and she was selected as one of the readers in the Blumenthal Writers and Readers Series. Her poetry collections are Oriflamb, from the North Carolina Writers Network, and Winter’s Exile, from Scots Plaid Press. Her novel, Salt, was selected in 2003 for Virginia Commonwealth University’s First Novel.
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    photo by Elizabeth Zuber
    2006
     
    photo by Tim BarnwellSheila Kay Adams (novelist, ballad singer, storyteller)
           Adams shares stories of characters and events from the small mountain community in western North Carolina where she was born, and passes on the rich musical heritage of her ancestors. A seventh generation ballad singer, she is also an award-winning author. Her book of short stories, Come Go Home With Me, was a winner of the North Carolina Historical Award for Historical Fiction, and her novel, My Old True Love, was a finalist for the Southeastern Booksellers Association 2004 Book of the Year Award. 
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    Dr. Lloyd Bailey  (historian, professor) 
           Born in Yancey in 1936, Dr. Bailey taught for 28 years in the divinity school of Duke University, and is (in retirement) professor of religion at Mount Olive College and Methodist College.  He has published five large volumes of the series Heritage of Toe River Valley and has four more in preparation.  As an authority on the history and genealogy of the Toe River Valley (the counties of Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey in Western North Carolina) he has published several other volumes: History of the Methodist Church in the Toe River Valley, History of the Bailey family of Yancey County and News from Yancey among others.
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    Bill Brooks (novelist, closet poet)
           Before turning pro in 1992 with his first novel, Brooks spent 16 years in the Health Care profession in the midwest.  Prior to that he had the typical writer's background, having worked a plethora of jobs including shoe salesman, shipyard laborer, factory worker, and gas station attendant and journalist.
           While Brooks publishes mostly western novels, he is most proud of his non-western novels, The Stone Garden, Pretty Boy, and Bonnie & Clyde: A Love Story. In the last several years he has begun to teach creative writing in various venues, including, last year a week at the famed Chautauqua Institute.
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    photo by Chris EnglishKathryn Stripling Byer (poet, essayist)
      Coming To Rest, Byer's fifth book of poetry, is due out in April 2006.  Also published are Catching Light (2002); Black Shawl (1998); Wildwood Flower (1992), which was the 1992 Lamont Poetry Selection of The Academy of American Poets; and The Girl in the Midst of the Harvest (1986), which was published in the Associated Writing Programs award series.  Among her other accolades are the Roanoke-Chowan Poetry Prize, the Brockman-Campbell Award, and appointment as Poet Laureate of North Carolina. She lives in Cullowhee, located in the western mountains of the state.
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    Gary Carden (playwright, storyteller, writer)
          Carden’s  latest success, a one-man-show entitled The Prince of Dark Corners (performed by Milton Higgins of Burnsville) has been filmed by Heritage Films (filmmaker, Neal Hutcheson) and is scheduled for broadcast by PBS.  Carden’s other dramatic works include The Raindrop Waltz and a series of dramatic monologues, including Nance Dude, Birdell and CoyMason Jars in the Flood received the Appalachian Writers Association Award for Book of the Year (200l) and his video, “Blow the Tannery Whistle” filmed by Tom Davenport has become a storytelling classic.  He is a 2006 recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award from the NC Folklore Society.
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    photo by John RosenthalPamela Duncan (novelist)
           Duncan was born in Asheville and raised in Black Mountain, Swannanoa, and Shelby, North Carolina, and currently lives in Saxapahaw, NC.  She holds an MA in English/Creative Writing from North Carolina State University in Raleigh.  Her first novel, Moon Women, was a Southeast Booksellers Association Award Finalist, and her second novel, Plant Life, won the 2003 Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction. 
          Duncan works at the NC Institute for Public Health at UNC and is currently at work on a third novel, titled The Big Beautiful (featuring Cassandra Moon), which will be published in Spring 2007.
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    John Ehle (novelist)
           Ehle was raised in Asheville and sets many of his books in North Carolina.  He has written 11 works of fiction including Move Over, Mountain, Winter People, The Journey of August King, Widow's Trial and The Road (which recounts building the railroad across the  Appalachian mountains).  His most recent book of non-fiction is Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation.  Ehle has received the North Carolina Award for Literature, the Thomas Wolfe Prize and the Lillian Smith Award for Southern Fiction, and he is a five-time winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Award for Fiction.
    Elizabeth Ellison (artist/illustrator)
           Elizabeth Ellison is a watercolorist-papermaker who has a gallery-studio in Bryson City, NC.  Ellison's pen-and-ink drawings and watercolor washes long have graced the work of her husband, writer/naturalist George Ellison, and others. Publishing venues include The Asheville Citizen-Times, Blue Ridge Outdoors, Outdoor Traveler, Friends of Wildlife, High Vistas, and Chinquapin.
      In September of 2006, The History Press (Charleston, SC) will publish Blue Ridge Nature Journal: Reflections on the Appalachians in Essays and Art by George and Elizabeth Ellison.
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    George Ellison (naturalist, columnist)
           Ellison, who resides in Bryson City, NC,  wrote the biographical introductions for the reissues of two Appalachian classics: Horace Kephart’s Our Southern Highlanders  and James Mooney’s History, Myths, and Sacred Formulas of the  Cherokees. He writes a “Nature Journal” column for the Asheville Citizen-Times  and a regional history “Back Then” column for Smoky Mountain News.  A selection of his "Back Then" columns published in 2005 by The History Press in Charleston, SC, as Mountain Passages: Natural and Cultural History of Western North Carolina and the Great Smoky Mountains  has gone into a third printing. More Information
    Jaki Shelton Green (poet, playwright)
           Green received the North Carolina Award for Literature in 2003 for her fine poetry and “inveterate championing of the underdog.”  Her publications are Dead on Arrival, Dead on Arrival and New Poems, Masks, Conjure Blues, singing a tree into dance, and Blue Opal, a play. She has performed her poetry and taught workshops in the United States, the Caribbean, Europe, and Brazil.  Green continues to teach creative writing to marginalized populations of our society such as the homeless, the newly literate, the incarcerated and the writer-as-survivor. Breath of the Song, Selected and New Poems by Jaki Shelton Green was released August 2005. 
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    Elizabeth Baird Hardy  (storyteller, educator) 
         Originally from Berea, Kentucky, Hardy comes from a family of storytellers. She began telling stories in public at the age of fifteen, and has hardly stopped since then. Her tales include her "Tales from Two Creeks," named after Indian Creek, where her mother's people lived, and "Jellico Creek," where her father grew up. She also relates the adventures of the hapless circuit-riding Preacher Templeton. In addition to telling stories and teaching workshops throughout the Southeast, Hardy is an English Instructor at Mayland Community College and lives in Avery County with her husband and son, her two favorite characters.
    Michael Hardy (historian, photographer)
           Hardy attended his first Civil War re-enactment at the age of twelve, beginning a fascination with the American Civil War that continues unabated. In 2003, McFarland released his first book, The Thirty-seventh North Carolina Troops: Tarheels in the Army of Northern Virginia. His other books include Avery County: Images of America (Arcadia 2005), A Short History of Old Watauga County (Parkway 2006), and The Battle of Hanover Court House (McFarland 2006).  Hardy is a full-time writer, historian, and photographer. He lives on a mountain in Avery County with his wife Elizabeth and their son Nathaniel.
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    Tommy Hays (novelist)
           Hays’s latest novel, The Pleasure Was Mine, was recently released in paperback. Hays has written two other novels -- Sam’s Crossing and In the Family Way, a selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club and winner of the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award.  He is Executive Director of the Great Smokies Writing Program at UNC-Asheville and Director of Creative Writing for the Academy at the SC Governor's School for the Arts.  He is a member of the National Book Critics Circle. He received his BA in English from Furman University and graduated from the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. 
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    Irene Honeycutt (poet) 
           Honeycutt has published two poetry collections: Waiting for the Trout to Speak (Novello Festival Press 2002) and  It Comes as a Dark Surprise, which won Sandstone Publishing's Regional Poetry Contest in 1992. Honeycutt’s first children’s book, The Prince with the Golden Hair, a fairy tale for children of all ages, will be published in the spring of 2006 by D-N Publishing. She is founder and director of the Central Piedmont's Community College's Annual Spring Literary Festival. In January of 2006, she was featured as NC Poet of the Week by poet laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer.
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    Gloria Houston (educator)
         Currently living again in her native western North Carolina, Dr. Houston works as a  writing consultant from her home and speaks as an author and writing consultant when her health permits. Houston's historical fiction has won more than 40 national and one international awards. Her innovative writing methods text and teacher handbook, How Writing Works:  Imposing Organizational Structure within the Writing Process, was released in 1994 by Allyn & Bacon/Longman.  She is working on a language arts text and handbook, Teaching the Language Arts through the Arts, also for Allyn & Bacon/Longman. 
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                                 presenting with
    (illustrator, visual artist)  Nicole Arnold

    photo by Olan Mills


    In 2006, High Country Publishers will debut the new edition of Gloria Houston’s Littlejim with Arnolds’s illustrations.  Her first book, The ‘Reel’ Thing:  A Story of Hope and Joy written by Hunter Darden, was published in 2002.  This book was set in the North Carolina mountains.  Nicole uses watercolor, pencil and colored pencil to achieve a wholesome and colorful optimism in her illustrations.  Arnold is also the Outreach Coordinator for a nonprofit art gallery where she plans art education programs for disadvantaged children.
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    Dot Jackson  (reporter, novelist)
           Jackson turned an abiding curiosity into a lifelong career in newspapers, going from murder trials to snake-handling prayer meetings to some of the hardest-fought environmental battles of our times. As an investigative reporter for the Charlotte Observer, she wrote about, and often brought to justice, the industrial polluters whose stories garnered Jackson several Pulitzer Prize nominations and a National Conservation Writer of the Year award. She also has collaborated on several acclaimed books of non-fiction.  Refuge is Dot Jackson’s first book-length work of fiction. 
    Hunter James  (investigative reporter, editorialist, novelist)
           James has spent more than thirty five years as an editorialist and correspondent for such papers as the Atlanta Constitution and Baltimore Sun, winning numerous press association awards for his work, as well as a share of the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. His articles and stories have appeared in Newsweek, National Geographic (book division), Historic Preservation, Southern Magazine, The Southern Review.  He has published eight books (including All the Forgotten Places and Last Days of the Big Grassy Fork) and a novel. The Famous Embroidered Towels of Dusseldorf: intrigue and betrayal in a Foreign Land is due out later this year. 
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    Cameron Judd (historical novelist) 
           A native of Greene County, Tennessee, Judd writes western fiction and is director of communications for Tusculum College in Greeneville, Tennessee.  Since 1980 Judd has written more than 30 novels published in the U.S. and Canada; more than two million copies of his novels remain in print, including the highly acclaimed The Overmountain Men, Crockett of Tennessee and Boone.  He is also the author of one nonfiction book about the Civil War in East Tennessee, The Bridge Burners.  His novels Crockett of Tennessee and The Canebrake Men were national finalists for the Western Writers of America Spur Award.
    Stephen Kirk (editor, non-fictionalist)
      Kirk has been the editor at John F. Blair, Publisher, since 1988. He is the author of Scribblers: Stalking the Authors of the Appalachia, an IPPY Award finalist, and First In Flight:  The Wright Brothers in North Carolina, one of the sources used in the national PBS documentary commemorating the first-flight centennial. The second story he ever wrote was selected for reprinting in the Best American Short Stories series. He lives near Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 
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    photo by Greg Vaughn PhotographySharyn McCrumb (novelist)
           McCrumb’s award-winning novels celebrating the history and folklore of Appalachia have received scholarly acclaim and ranked on the New York Times Best-Seller lists. Among her works are Ghost Riders, The Songcatcher, The Ballad of Frankie Silver, The Rosewood Casket, She Walks These Hills, and If  Ever I Return, Pretty Peggy-O. In her newest novel, St. Dale (Kensington 2005), McCrumb has crafted a moving tale of transformation and everyday miracles that finds the seam of humanity behind our need for perfect heroes. 
           In November 2003, she was presented with the Wilma Dykeman Award for Regional Historical Literature by the East Tennessee Historical Society
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    Joan Medlicott (novelist)
           Born in the Virgin Islands, Medlicott has lived in many towns and cities in the US and in Europe. After careers in Horticulture and as Program Coodinator for a Senior Center in Florida, Joan began a career in writing. At age 64 her first Ladies of Covington novel was published. The sixth in the series, Two Days After the Wedding, will be published in June 2006. The seventh novel will be out in 2008. Joan's novel, The Three Mrs. Parkers, was very well received and she is working on another non-Covington novel. Joan can be characterized as an optimist and a self-starter. She lives and works in Barnardsville, north of Asheville, North Carolina. 
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    photo by Emilee RoseKaren Miller  (educator, children's novelist)
           Protesting “There’s nothing to read,” Karen Miller’s 6th grade students convinced her to write a book just for them. Everyone liked monsters, they told her. But there weren’t any books about real monsters. So Miller began a six year study of undiscovered beasts. Her first book, Monsters, Shapeshifters and Water Beasts, will be published by Henry Holt in spring 2007.
            A teacher, literature consultant, bookseller and mother of four, Karen Miller lives in Burnsville, North Carolina with her husband, Bob and dog Lucy. She has four adult children, aged 22-31 years old. 
    Michael Parker  (novelist)
           Parker is the author of five works of fiction including the novels Hello Down There and If You Want Me To Stay.  His stories have appeared in the Oxford American, Five Points, Shenandoah and many other magazines and in the Pushcart, New Stories from the South and O. Henry Award anthologies.  A new collection of stories, Don’t Make Me Stop Now, is forthcoming from Algonquin Books in 2007.  For his work he has received fellowships in fiction from the North Carolina Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the 2006 Mary Frances Hobson Award in Arts and Letters.  He teaches in the MFA Writing Program at UNC Greensboro.
    Charles F. Price (historical novelist)
           Price has published four novels to date:  Hiwassee: A Novel of the Civil War, Freedom's Altar, (1999 Sir Walter Raleigh Award), The Cock's Spur (Independent Publisher's 2001 Book Award as one of the Ten Outstanding Books of the Year and Clark Cox Historical Fiction Award) and Where the Water-Dogs Laughed.
           One of the chief characters in his new Revolutionary War novel Nor the Battle to the Strong is a maternal ancestor who served in the Continental Army.  Nor the Battle to the Strong is forthcoming in 2007 from Frederic C. Beil Publisher of Savannah, GA.  He currently lives in Yancey County.
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    Jim Priesmeyer (historic storyteller)
           During his seven years developing the Historic McElroy House, the Museum of Yancey County History, Priesmeyer uncovered the personal stories of the home's owners and their insights into 200 years of the county's history.  Using his training as a grant writer (a successful grant is a story told in a compelling way) and his extensive experience as a character actor, Jim wrote and performs CSA Gen. J.W. McElroy's (1820-1870) story "A Final Farewell" and the companion story of US Capt. Wm. Moore (1850-1900) "A Fond Farewell".  A cast of other historical figures are fodder for other one man shows. 
    Jack R. Pyle (novelist)
           Pyle writes mysteries (The Death of Adam Stone), love stories (After Many a Summer), young adult fiction (The Gold Bug of Farrow Point) and has even broached Civil War Era women's rights in Black Horse White Rider. The Sound of Distant Thunder was chosen Book of the Year by the Appalachian Writers Association in 1999.  He has co-authored the two "moon" books with Taylor Reese because he came from that background and because he could see this bit of planting lore being lost on the "Computer Generation."  Pyle has also published a book of short stories Pieces of the Puzzle.
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    Ron Rash (poet, novelist, short storyist)
          Rash is the author of six books: The Night The New Jesus Fell to Earth (short stories), Casualties (short stories), Eureka Mill (poetry), and Among the Believers (poetry), Raising the Dead (poetry), One Foot in Eden (novel) and Saints at the River (novel) His third novel, The World Made Straight, will be published by Henry Holt in January, 2006.  Rash is a past winner of an NEA Poetry Fellowship.  In 2002, he was awarded Foreword Magazine's Gold Medal in Literary Fiction for his novel One Foot in Eden. The novel was also named Appalachian Book of the Year.  Saints at the River has been chosen for Western North Carolina's  Together We Read  program. 
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    Taylor Reese  (eclectic author)
           Reese has authored several books including  HUMOR Is Where You Find It,   HUMOR and A Little Bit More, From Here To There (a memoir of the first 17 years of his life), and A Glimpse At Life (a book of down-to-earth poetry written in four categories:  Nature, Encouragement, Humor and Miscellany.)  With co-author Jack R. Pyle, he has written two books on how to use the farmer’s almanac:  Raising With The Moon and You and the Man in the Moon.  Reese was a court reporter for three decades, taking down the words of everybody else, and decided to write some of his own.
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    Jacque Red Leaf  (storyteller)
           Both Cherokee and Choctaw, she is known by her Cherokee name Eagle Woman.   Her life is put into teaching Indian arts, customs, games, songs, cultural vaules, tradition and history.  She is a Traditonal Dancer, teaches beadwork, basketweaving, and leather work.  Perhaps better known for her legend-telling than anything else, Eagle Woman brings the native culture to life through the legends not only of the Cherokee, but many other tribes, as well.  She has lectured and spoken at many universitites, art centers, museums and civic organizations all over the country.  Currently she lives in Yancey County, North Carolina.
    photo by Ed SeelPat Riviere-Seel (poet)
           Her first collection of poems, No Turning Back Now, was published by Finishing Line Press in 2004 and nominated for a Pushcart Prize. She teaches in UNCA’s Great Smokies Writing Program and at the College for Seniors at UNCA.  She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Queens University of Charlotte. 
           She is the president of the North Carolina Poetry Society and serves on the Board of Directors of the Poetry Council of NC. A native of Shelby, NC, she is a former resident of Yancey County. She currently lives in Asheville with her husband and two cats. 
    David Schulman (novelist, columnist, freelancer)
           Schulman began his writing career in the second grade in Sylva, North Carolina while stretched out on the living room floor watching the Milton Berle Show. After two decades developing his own chain of clothing stores in Western NC, he began chronicling his own and others' history of growing up Jewish in the South, eventually winning the NC Press Club's Best Personal Columnist Award for 1994 and 1995 for his articles in Charlotte's Times-Outlook magazine.  He now writes frequently for Our State: Down Home in North Carolina magazine as well as other periodicals. The Past Is Never Dead is his first novel. 
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    Betty Smith (ballad singer, educator)
      Smith has performed, taught and shared the traditional music of the South for over thirty years in classrooms, concert halls, workshops, and festivals. She has been honored by the Appalachian Writers Association for her contributions to Appalachian Literature, by the North Carolina Folklore Society for her contributions to the study and appreciation of folklife with the Brown-Hudson Award, and the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Award for “significant contributions to Appalachian music”.  Her book, Jane Hicks Gentry: A Singer Among Singers, was awarded the Willie Parker Peace History Book Award by the North Carolina Society of Historians.
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    photo by Jan HensleyShelby Stephenson (poet, editor, musician)
           Stephenson, professor of English at UNC-Pembroke, edits Pembroke Magazine. He has received the Zoe Kincaid Brockman Memorial Award, the Playwright's Fund of North Carolina Chapbook Prize, and the 2001 North Carolina Award in Literature. In addition to a poetic documentary Plankhouse (with photos by Roger Manley), he has published Middle Creek Poems, Carolina Shout!, Finch’s Mash, The Persimmon Tree Carol, Poor People, Greatest Hits, Fiddledeedee, and POSSUM (Bright Hill Press Prize and Campbell-Brockman Award). He has also made the CDs: Hank Williams Tribute and The Stephenson Brothers & Linda Sing the Old Songs.
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    Peter Turchi (novelist, non-fictionalist, educator)
           Turchi is the author of a novel, a collection of stories, and two books of nonfiction, including, most recently, Maps of the Imagination: The Writer as Cartographer. He has also co-edited two anthologies, The Story Behind the Story and Bringing the Devil to His Knees, and an exhibition catalog for the artist Charles Ritchie. The recipient of North Carolina’s Sir Walter Raleigh Award and fellowships from the NEA and the Guggenheim Foundation, he has taught in and directed the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College since 1993.
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    Seabrook Wilkinson (educator, literary critic)
           Wilkinson’s connections with Charleston and the Carolina Lowcountry go back to 1670.  Most of his education was far afield, at Harvard (A.B., History of Art) and then Oxford (B.A., M.A., Theology).  He remained in Britain to work in another ancestral city, Edinburgh, as Head of English at Fettes College.  As Charlestonians tend to do, he came home to roost, and while teaching at local colleges began to ascend the Ph.D. salmon-leap, whose top rung he is now approaching.  His published criticism ranges from Marlowe to Frost.  After decades of scrutinizing the poems of others, he began to write his own again; A Local Habitation is forthcoming. 
    Perry Deane Young  (biographer, playwright)
      Young has authored nine books, two plays and one screenplay.  Several of his books stem from Yancey county hertitage:  The Untold Story of Frankie Silver, Was She Justly Hanged? Hanged by a Dream, and Our Young Family. His first book was the widely praised Two of the Missing, a Vietnam memoir. The David Kopay Story, spent nine weeks on the New York Times Bestseller and was named one of the ten Best Books for Young Adults of 1977 by the American Library Association. He has also published a drama, Mountain of Hope, based on the life and death of UNC Prof. Elisha Mitchell, for whom the county's mountain is named. 
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    Isabel Zuber (poet, novelist)
           Zuber was born and grew up in Boone, NC. She lives in Winston-Salem, was a librarian at Wake Forest University for many years, and is now writing full time. Some of her prizes include the publication prize in the North Carolina Writers Network poetry chapbook contest, Lee Smith Award for Fiction from the Appalachian Writers Association, University of Tennessee Press prize for short story, Forsyth County Arts Council grant, and she was selected as one of the readers in the Blumenthal Writers and Readers Series. Her poetry collections are Oriflamb, from the North Carolina Writers Network, and Winter’s Exile, from Scots Plaid Press. Her novel, Salt, was selected in 2003 for Virginia Commonwealth University’s First Novel.
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